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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

the merchant's daughter?" 

 

"Aye, Sire. The man whom my cousin killed maltreated me, whose only 

wrong was that I waited to see your Grace pass by. Look on my 

torn cloak." 

 

"Little wonder that he killed him for the sake of those eyes of yours, 

maiden. But this witness may be tainted." And again he smiled, adding, 

"Is there no other?" 

 

Betty advanced to speak, but d'Aguilar, stepping forward, lifted his 

bonnet from his head, bowed and said in English: 

 

"Your Grace, there is; I saw it all. This gallant gentleman had no 

blame. It was the servants of my countryman de Ayala who were to blame, 

at any rate at first, and afterwards came the trouble." 

 

Now the ambassador de Ayala broke in, claiming satisfaction for the 

killing of his man, for he was still very angry, and saying that if it 

were not given, he would report the matter to their Majesties of Spain, 

and let them know how their servants were treated in London. 

 

At these words Henry grew grave, who, above all things, wished to give 

no offence to Ferdinand and Isabella. 

 

"You have done an ill day's work, Peter Brome," he said, "and one of 

which my attorney must consider. Meanwhile, you will be best in safe 

keeping," and he turned as though to order his arrest. 

 

"Sire," exclaimed Peter, "I live at Master Castell's house in Holborn, 

nor shall I run away." 

 

"Who will answer for that," asked the king, "or that you will not make 

more riots on your road thither?" 

 

"I will answer, your Grace," said d'Aguilar quietly, "if this lady will 

permit that I escort her and her cousin home. Also," he added in a low 

voice, "it seems to me that to hale him to a prison would be more like 

to breed a riot than to let him go." 

 

Henry glanced round him at the great crowd who were gathered watching 

this scene, and saw something in their faces which caused him to agree 

with d'Aguilar. 

 

"So be it, Marquis," he said. "I have your word, and that of Peter 

Brome, that he will be forthcoming if called upon. Let that dead man be 

laid in the Abbey till to-morrow, when this matter shall be inquired of. 

Excellency, give me your arm; I have greater questions of which I wish 

to speak with you ere we sleep." 


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