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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

dressed richly, but simply, in black velvet, with a cap of the same 

material in which was fastened a single pearl, rode a tall cavalier. He 

was about five-and-thirty years of age, and very handsome, having 

piercing black eyes and a stern, clean-cut face. 

 

In every man, it is said, there can be found a resemblance, often far 

off and fanciful enough, to some beast or bird or other creature, and 

certainly in this case it was not hard to discover. The man resembled an 

eagle, which, whether by chance or design, was the crest he bore upon 

his servants' livery, and the trappings of his horse. The unflinching 

eyes, the hooked nose, the air of pride and mastery, the thin, long 

hand, the quick grace of movement, all suggested that king of birds, 

suggested also, as his motto said, that what he sought he would find, 

and what he found he would keep. Just now he was watching the interview 

between the English king and the leaders of the crowd whom his Grace had 

been pleased to summon, with an air of mingled amusement and contempt. 

 

"You find the scene strange, Marquis," said the ambassador, glancing at 

him shrewdly. 

 

"Senor, here in England, if it pleases your Excellency," he answered 

gravely, "Senor d'Aguilar. The marquis you mentioned lives in Spain--an 

accredited envoy to the Moors of Granada; the Senor d'Aguilar, a humble 

servant of Holy Church," and he crossed himself, "travels abroad--upon 

the Church's business, and that of their Majesties'." 

 

"And his own too, sometimes, I believe," answered the ambassador drily. 

"But to be frank, what I do not understand about you, Senor d'Aguilar, 

as I know that you have abandoned political ambitions, is why you do not 

enter my profession, and put on the black robe once and for all. What 

did I say--black? With your opportunities and connections it might be 

red by now, with a hat to match." 

 

The Senor d'Aguilar smiled a little as he replied. 

 

"You said, I think, that sometimes I travel on my own business. Well, 

there is your answer. You are right, I have abandoned worldly 

ambitions--most of them. They are troublesome, and for some people, if 

they be born too high and yet not altogether rightly, very dangerous. 

The acorn of ambition often grows into an oak from which men hang." 

 

"Or into a log upon which men's heads can be cut off. Senor, I 

congratulate you. You have the wisdom that grasps the substance and lets 

the shadows flit. It is really very rare." 


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