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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

when the time comes," broke in de Ayala. "But the audience is done, and 

his Highness beckons us forward to the feast, where there will be no 

heretics to vex us, and, as it is Lent, not much to eat. Come, Senor! 

for we stop the way." 

 

Three hours had gone by, and the sun sank redly, for even at that spring 

season it was cold upon the marshy lands of Westminster, and there was 

frost in the air. On the open space opposite to the banqueting-hall, in 

front of which were gathered squires and grooms with horses, stood and 

walked many citizens of London, who, their day's work done, came to see 

the king pass by in state. Among these were a man and a lady, the latter 

attended by a handsome young woman, who were all three sufficiently 

striking in appearance to attract some notice in the throng. 

 

The man, a person of about thirty years of age, dressed in a merchant's 

robe of cloth, and wearing a knife in his girdle, seemed over six feet 

in height, while his companion, in her flowing, fur-trimmed cloak, was, 

for a woman, also of unusual stature. He was not, strictly speaking, a 

handsome man, being somewhat too high of forehead and prominent of 

feature; moreover, one of his clean-shaven cheeks, the right, was marred 

by the long, red scar of a sword-cut which stretched from the temple to 

the strong chin. His face, however, was open and manly, if rather stern, 

and the grey eyes were steady and frank. It was not the face of a 

merchant, but rather that of one of good degree, accustomed to camps and 

war. For the rest, his figure was well-built and active, and his voice 

when he spoke, which was seldom, clear and distinct to loudness, but 

cultivated and pleasant--again, not the voice of a merchant. 

 

Of the lady's figure little could be seen because of the long cloak that 

hid it, but the face, which appeared within its hood when she turned and 

the dying sunlight filled her eyes, was lovely indeed, for from her 

birth to her death-day Margaret Castell--fair Margaret, as she was 

called--had this gift to a degree that is rarely granted to woman. 

Rounded and flower-like was that face, most delicately tinted also, 

with rich and curving lips and a broad, snow-white brow. But the wonder 

of it, what distinguished her above everything else from other beautiful 

women of her time, was to be found in her eyes, for these were not blue 

or grey, as might have been expected from her general colouring, but 

large, black, and lustrous; soft, too, as the eyes of a deer, and 


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