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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

servant, demanding, in a loud voice, that the man who had killed him 

should be given up. 

 

"We will not give him up to a Spanish priest," shouted the mob. "Come 

and take him if you want him," and once more the tumult grew, while 

Peter and his companions made ready to fight. 

 

Fighting there would have been also, notwithstanding all that d'Aguilar 

could do to prevent it; but of a sudden the noise began to die away, and 

a hush fell upon the place. Then between the uplifted weapons walked a 

short, richly clad man, who turned suddenly and faced the mob. It was 

King Henry himself. 

 

"Who dare to draw swords in my streets, before my very palace doors?" he 

asked in a cold voice. 

 

A dozen hands pointed at Peter. 

 

"Speak," said the king to him. 

 

"Margaret, come here," cried Peter; and the girl was thrust forward to 

him. 

 

"Sire," he said, "that man," and he pointed to the corpse of Andrew, 

"tried to do wrong to this maiden, John Castell's child. I, her cousin, 

threw him down. He drew his sword and came at me, and I killed him with 

my staff. See, it lies there. Then the Spaniards--his comrades--would 

have cut me down, and I called for English help. Sire, that is all." 

 

The king looked him up and down. 

 

"A merchant by your dress," he said; "but a soldier by your mien. How 

are you named?" 

 

"Peter Brome, Sire." 

 

"Ah! There was a certain Sir Peter Brome who fell at Bosworth Field--not 

fighting for me," and he smiled. "Did you know him perchance?" 

 

"He was my father, Sire, and I saw him slain--aye, and slew the slayer." 

 

"Well can I believe it," answered Henry, considering him. "But how comes 

it that Peter Brome's son, who wears that battle scar across his face, 

is clad in merchant's woollen?" 

 

"Sire," said Peter coolly, "my father sold his lands, lent his all to 

the Crown, and I have never rendered the account. Therefore I must live 

as I can." 

 

The king laughed outright as he replied: 

 

"I like you, Peter Brome, though doubtless you hate me." 

 

"Not so, Sire. While Richard lived I fought for Richard. Richard is 

gone; and, if need be, I would fight for Henry, who am an Englishman, 

and serve England's king." 

 

"Well said, and I may have need of you yet, nor do I bear you any 

grudge. But, I forgot, is it thus that you would fight for me, by 

causing riot in my streets, and bringing me into trouble with my good 

friends the Spaniards?" 

 

"Sire, you know the story." 

 

"I know your story, but who bears witness to it? Do you, maiden, Castell 


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