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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

death, or so says this letter." 

 

"To be with me--hurt to the death! Give it me--nay, read it, I cannot 

see." 

 

So Peter read. 

 

"I scent a plot," said Castell in a strained voice as he finished, "and 

I think that hound of a Spaniard is at the bottom of it, or Betty, or 

both. Here, you fellow, tell us what you know, and be swift if you would 

keep a sound skin." 

 

"That would I, why not?" answered the man, and told all the tale of the 

coming of the sailor. 

 

"Go, bid the men bring back the horses, all of them," said Castell 

almost before he had done; "and, Peter, look not so dazed, but come, 

drink a cup of wine. We shall need it, both of us, before this night is 

over. What! is there never a fellow of all my servants in the house?" So 

he shouted till his folk, who had returned with him from the ship, came 

running from the kitchen. 

 

He bade them bring food and liquor, and while they gulped down the wine, 

for they could not eat, Castell told how their Mistress Margaret had 

been tricked away, and must be followed. Then, hearing the horses being 

led back from the stables, they ran to the door and mounted, and, 

followed by their men, a dozen or more of them, in all, galloped off 

into the darkness, taking another road for Tilbury, that by which 

Margaret went, not because they were sure of this, but because it was 

the shortest. 

 

But the horses were tired, and the night was dark and rainy, so it came 

about that the clock of some church struck three of the morning before 

ever they drew near to Tilbury. Now they were passing the little quay 

where Margaret and Betty had entered the boat, Castell and Peter riding 

side by side ahead of the others in stern silence, for they had nothing 

to say, when a familiar voice hailed them--that of Thomas the groom. 

 

"I saw your horses' heads against the sky," he explained, "and knew 

them." 

 

"Where is your mistress?" they asked both in a breath. 

 

"Gone, gone with Betty Dene in a boat, from this quay, to be rowed to 

the _Margaret_, or so I thought. Having stabled the horses as I was 

bidden, I came back here to await them. But that was hours ago, and I 

have seen no soul, and heard nothing except the wind and the water, till 

I heard the galloping of your horses." 

 

"On to Tilbury, and get boats," said Castell. "We must catch the 

_Margaret_ ere she sails at dawn. Perhaps the women are aboard of her." 

 

"If so, I think Spaniards took them there, for I am sure they were not 

English in that craft," said Thomas, as he ran by the side of Castell's 


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