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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

chance that there would be fighting, and he was loth to ask any man to 

risk life or limb against his will, especially as they came out to trade 

and not to fight. Still, to those who chose to accompany them, should 

they win through safely, he promised double wage, and a present charged 

upon his estate, and would give them writings to that effect. As for 

those who did not, they could leave the ship now before she sailed. 

 

When he had finished, the sailormen, of whom there were about thirty, 

with the stout-hearted captain, Jacob Smith, a sturdy-built man of fifty 

years of age, at the head of them, conferred together, and at last, with 

one exception--that of a young new-married man, whose heart failed 

him--they accepted the offer, swearing that they would see the thing 

through to the end, were it good or ill, for they were all Englishmen, 

and no lovers of the Spaniards. Moreover, so bitter a wrong stirred 

their blood. Indeed, although for the most part they were not sailors, 

six of the twelve men who had ridden with them from London prayed that 

they might come too, for the love they had to Margaret, their master, 

and Peter; and they took them. The other six they sent ashore again, 

bearing letters to Castell's friends, agents, and reeves, as to the 

transfer of his business and the care of his lands, houses, and other 

properties during his absence. Also, they took a short will duly signed 

by Castell and witnessed, wherein he left all his goods of whatever 

sort that remained unsettled or undevised, to Margaret and Peter, or 

the survivor of them, or their heirs, or failing these, for the purpose 

of founding a hospital for the poor. Then these men bade them farewell 

and departed, very heavy at heart, just as the anchor was hauled home, 

and the sails began to draw in the stiff morning breeze. 

 

About ten o'clock they rounded the Nore bank safely, and here spoke a 

fishing-boat, who told them that more than six hours before they had 

seen the _San Antonio_ sail past them down Channel, and noted two women 

standing on her deck, holding each other's hands and gazing shorewards. 

Then, knowing that there was no mistake, there being nothing more that 

they could do, worn out with grief and journeying, they ate some food 

and went to their cabin to sleep. 

 

As he laid him down Peter remembered that at this very hour he should 

have been in church taking Margaret as his bride--Margaret, who was now 

in the power of the Spaniard--and swore a great and bitter oath that 


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