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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

d'Aguilar should pay him back for all this shame and agony. Indeed, 

could his enemy have seen the look on Peter's face he might well have 

been afraid, for this Peter was an ill man to cross, and had no 

forgiving heart; also, his wrong was deep. 

 

For four days the wind held, and they ran down Channel before it, hoping 

to catch sight of the Spaniard; but the _San Antonio_ was a swift 

caravel of 250 tons with much canvas, for she carried four masts, and 

although the _Margaret_ was also a good sailer, she had but two masts, 

and could not come up with her. Or, for anything they knew, they might 

have missed her on the seas. On the afternoon of the fourth day, when 

they were off the Lizard, and creeping along very slowly under a light 

breeze, the look-out man reported a ship lying becalmed ahead. Peter, 

who had the eyes of a hawk, climbed up the mast to look at her, and 

presently called down that he believed from her shape and rig she must 

be the caravel, though of this he could not be sure as he had never seen 

her. Then the captain, Smith, went up also, and a few minutes later 

returned saying that without doubt it was the _San Antonio._ 

 

Now there was a great and joyful stir on board the _Margaret_, every man 

seeing to his sword and their long or cross bows, of which there were 

plenty, although they had no bombards or cannon, that as yet were rare 

on merchant ships. Their plan was to run alongside the _San Antonio_ and 

board her, for thus they hoped to recover Margaret. As for the anger of 

the king, which might well fall on them for this deed, since he would 

think little of the stealing of a pair of Englishwomen, of that they 

must take their chance. 

 

Within half an hour everything was ready, and Peter, pacing to and fro, 

looked happier than he had done since he rode away to Dedham. The light 

breeze still held, although, if it reached the _San Antonio_, it did not 

seem to move her, and, with the help of it, by degrees they came to 

within half a mile of the caravel. Then the wind dropped altogether, and 

there the two ships lay. Still the set of the tide, or some current, 

seemed to be drawing them towards each other, so that when the night 

closed in they were not more than four hundred paces apart, and the 

Englishmen had great hopes that before morning they would close, and be 

able to board by the light of the moon. 

 

But this was not to be, since about nine o'clock thick clouds rose up 


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