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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

which covered the heavens, while with the clouds came strong winds 

blowing off the land, and, when at length the dawn broke, all they could 

see of the _San Antonio_ was her topmasts as she rose upon the seas, 

flying southwards swiftly. This, indeed, was the last sight they had of 

her for two long weeks. 

 

From Ushant all across the Bay the airs were very light and variable, 

but when at length they came off Finisterre a gale sprang up from the 

north-east which drove them forward very fast. It was on the second 

night of this gale, as the sun set, that, running out of some mist and 

rain, suddenly they saw the _San Antonio_ not a mile away, and rejoiced, 

for now they knew that she had not made for any port in the north of 

Spain, as, although she was bound for Cadiz, they feared she might have 

done to trick them. Then the rain came on again, and they saw her 

no more. 

 

All down the coast of Portugal the weather grew more heavy day by day, 

and when they reached St. Vincent's Cape and bore round for Cadiz, it 

blew a great gale. Now it was that for the third time they viewed the 

_San Antonio_ labouring ahead of them, nor, except at night, did they 

lose sight of her any more until the end of that voyage. Indeed, on the 

next day they nearly came up with her, for she tried to beat in to 

Cadiz, but, losing one of her masts in a fierce squall, and seeing that 

the _Margaret_, which sailed better in this tempest, would soon be 

aboard of her, abandoned her plan, and ran for the Straits of Gibraltar. 

 

Past Tarifa Point they went, having the coast of Africa on their 

right; past the bay of Algegiras, where the _San Antonio_ did not try to 

harbour; past Gibraltar's grey old rock, where the signal fires were 

burning, and so at nightfall, with not a mile between them, out into the 

Mediterranean Sea. 

 

Here the gale was furious, so that they could scarcely carry a rag of 

canvas, and before morning lost one of their topmasts. It was an anxious 

night, for they knew not if they would live through it; moreover, the 

hearts of Castell and of Peter were torn with fear lest the Spaniard 

should founder and take Margaret with her to the bottom of the sea. When 

at length the wild, stormy dawn broke, however, they saw her, apparently 

in an evil case, labouring away upon their starboard bow, and by noon 

came to within a furlong of her, so that they could see the sailors 

crawling about on her high poop and stern. Yes, and they saw more than 

this, for presently two women ran from some cabin waving a white cloth 


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