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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

under the rain of English arrows, came right across the bows of the 

_Margaret_, heading for the little bay of Calahonda, that is the port of 

Motril, for here the shore was not much more than a league away. 

 

"Now," said Jacob Smith, the captain of the _Margaret_, who stood under 

the shelter of the bulwarks with Castell and Peter, "up that bay lies a 

Spanish town. I know it, for I have anchored there, and if once the _San 

Antonio_ reaches it, good-bye to our lady, for they will take her to 

Granada, not thirty miles away across the mountains, where this Marquis 

of Morella is a mighty man, for there is his palace. Say then, master, 

what shall we do? In five more minutes the Spaniard will be across our 

bows again. Shall we run her down, which will be easy, and take our 

chance of picking up the women, or shall we let them be taken captive to 

Granada and give up the chase?" 

 

"Never," said Peter. "There is another thing that we can do--follow them 

into the bay, and attack them there on shore." 

 

"To find ourselves among hundreds of the Spaniards, and have our throats 

cut," answered Smith, the captain, coolly. 

 

"If we ran them down," asked Castell, who had been thinking deeply all 

this while, "should we not sink also?" 

 

"It might be so," answered Smith; "but we are built of English oak, and 

very stout forward, and I think not. But she would sink at once, being 

near to it already, and the odds are that the women are locked in the 

cabin or between decks out of reach of the arrows, and must go 

with her." 

 

"There is another plan," said Peter sternly, "and that is to grapple 

with her and board her, and this I will do." 

 

The captain, a stout man with a flat face that never changed, lifted his 

eyebrows, which was his only way of showing surprise. 

 

"What!" he said. "In this sea? I have fought in some wars, but never 

have I known such a thing." 

 

"Then, friend, you shall know it now, if I can but find a dozen men to 

follow me," answered Peter with a savage laugh. "What? Shall I see my 

mistress carried off before my eyes and strike no blow to save her? 

Rather will I trust in God and do it, and if I die, then die I must, as 

a man should. There is no other way." 

 

Then he turned and called in a loud voice to those who stood around or 

loosed arrows at the Spaniard: 

 

"Who will come with me aboard yonder ship? Those who live shall spend 

their days in ease thereafter, that I promise, and those who fall will 


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