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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

the ship, and one of these struck the man with them through the throat, 

so that he fell to the deck clasping at it, and presently rolled into 

the sea also. Another pierced Castell through his right forearm, causing 

his sword to drop and slide away from him. Peter seized the arrow, 

snapped it in two, and drew it out; but Castell's right arm was now 

helpless, and with his left he could do no more than cling to the 

broken mast. 

 

"We have done our best, son," he said, "and failed. Margaret will learn 

that we would have saved her if we could, but we shall not meet 

her here." 

 

Peter ground his teeth, and looked about him desperately, for he had no 

words to say. What should he do? Leave Castell and rush for the waist of 

the ship and so perish, or stay and die there? Nay, he would not be 

butchered like a bird on a bough, he would fall fighting. 

 

"Farewell," he called through the gale. "God rest our souls!" Then, 

waiting till the ship steadied herself, he ran aft, and reaching the 

ladder that led to her tower, staggered down it to the waist of the 

vessel, and at its foot halted, holding to the rail. 

 

The scene before him was strange enough, for there, ranged round the 

bulwarks, were the Spanish men, who watched him curiously, whilst a few 

paces away, resting against the mast, stood d'Aguilar, who lifted his 

hand, in which there was no weapon, and addressed him. 

 

"Senor Brome," he shouted, "do not move another step or you are a dead 

man. Listen to me first, and then do what you will. Am I safe from your 

sword while I speak?" 

 

Peter nodded his head in assent, and d'Aguilar drew nearer, for even in 

that more sheltered place it was hard to hear because of the howling of 

the tempest. 

 

"Senor," he said to Peter, "you are a very brave man, and have done a 

deed such as none of us have seen before; therefore, I wish to spare you 

if I may. Also, I have worked you bitter wrong, driven to it by the 

might of love and jealousy, for which reason also I wish to spare you. 

To set upon you now would be but murder, and, whatever else I do, I will 

not murder. First, let me ease your mind. Your lady and mine is aboard 

here; but fear not, she has come and will come to no harm from me, or 

from any man while I live. If for no other reason, I do not desire to 

affront one who, I hope, will be my wife by her own free will, and whom 

I have brought to Spain that she might not make this impossible by 

becoming yours. Senor, believe me, I would no more force a woman's will 


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