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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

lean, fierce-faced, long-armed, a terrible man to see in the fiery light 

that broke upon him from beneath the edge of a black cloud; the Spaniard 

tall also, and agile, but to all appearance as unconcerned as though 

this were but a pleasure bout, and not a duel to the death with a 

woman's fate hanging on the hazard. D'Aguilar wore a breastplate of 

gold-inlaid black steel and a helmet, while Peter had but his tunic of 

bull's hide and iron-lined cap, though his straight cut-and-thrust sword 

was heavier and mayhap half an inch longer than that of his foe. 

 

Thus, then, they stood while Castell and all the ship's company, save 

the helmsman who steered her to the harbour's mouth, clung to the 

bulwarks and the cordage of the mainmast, and, forgetful of their own 

peril, watched in utter silence. 

 

It was Peter who thrust the first, straight at the throat, but d'Aguilar 

parried deftly, so that the sword point went past his neck, and before 

it could be drawn back again, struck at Peter. The blow fell upon the 

side of his steel cap, and glanced thence to his left shoulder, but, 

being light, did him no harm. Swiftly came the answer, which was not 

light, for it fell so heavily upon d'Aguilar's breastplate, that he 

staggered back. After him sprang Peter, thinking that the game was his, 

but at that moment the ship, which had entered the breakers of the 

harbour bar, rolled terribly, and sent them both reeling to the 

bulwarks. Nor did she cease her rolling, so that, smiting and thrusting 

wildly, they staggered backwards and forwards across the deck, gripping 

with their left hands at anything they could find to steady them, till 

at length, bruised and breathless, they fell apart unwounded, and 

rested awhile. 

 

"An ill field this to fight on, Senor," gasped d'Aguilar. 

 

"I think that it will serve our turn," said Peter grimly, and rushed at 

him like a bull. It was just then that a great sea came aboard the ship, 

a mass of green water which struck them both and washed them like straws 

into the scuppers, where they rolled half drowned. Peter rose the first, 

coughing out salt water, and rubbing it from his eyes, to see d'Aguilar 

still upon the deck, his sword lying beside him, and holding his right 

wrist with his left hand. 

 

"Who gave you the hurt?" he asked, "I or your fall?" 

 

"The fall, Senor," answered d'Aguilar; "I think that it has broken my 

wrist. But I have still my left hand. Suffer me to arise, and we will 


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