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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

finish this fray." 

 

As the words passed his lips a gust of wind, more furious than any that 

had gone before, concentrated as it was through a gorge in the 

mountains, struck the caravel at the very mouth of the harbour, and laid 

her over on her beam ends. For a while it seemed as though she must 

capsize and sink, till suddenly her mainmast snapped like a stick and 

went overboard, when, relieved of its weight, by slow degrees she 

righted herself. Down upon the deck came the cross yard, one end of it 

crashing through the roof of the cabin in which Margaret and Betty were 

confined, splitting it in two, while a block attached to the other fell 

upon the side of Peter's head and, glancing from the steel cap, struck 

him on the neck and shoulder, hurling him senseless to the deck, where, 

still grasping his sword, he lay with arms outstretched. 

 

Out of the ruin of the cabin appeared Margaret and Betty, the former 

very pale and frightened, and the latter muttering prayers, but, as it 

chanced, both uninjured. Clinging to the tangled ropes they crept 

forward, seeking refuge in the waist of the ship, for the heavy spar 

still worked and rolled above them, resting on the wreck of the cabin 

and the bulwarks, whence presently it slid into the sea. By the stump of 

the broken mainmast they halted, their long locks streaming in the gale, 

and here it was that Margaret caught sight of Peter lying upon his back, 

his face red with blood, and sliding to and fro as the vessel rolled. 

 

She could not speak, but in mute appeal pointed first to him and then to 

d'Aguilar, who stood near, remembering as she did so her vision in the 

house at Holborn, which was thus terribly fulfilled. Holding to a rope, 

d'Aguilar drew near to her and spoke into her ear. "Lady," he said, 

"this is no deed of mine. We were fighting a fair fight, for he had 

boarded the ship when the mast fell and killed him. Blame me not for his 

death, but seek comfort from God." 

 

She heard, and, looking round her wildly, perceived her father 

struggling towards her; then, with a bitter cry, fell senseless on 

his breast. 


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