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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

Christian by faith, has many heathen tastes, and, like the Moors, 

surrounds himself with a seraglio of beautiful women, as I know, for 

often I act as his chaplain, as in Granada there are no priests. 

Moreover, there is a purpose in all this, for, being partly of their 

blood, he is accredited to the court of their sultan, Boabdil, by 

Ferdinand and Isabella in whose interests he works in secret. For, 

strangers, you should know, if you do not know it already, that their 

Majesties have for long been at war against the Moor, and purpose to 

take what remains of his kingdom from him, and make it Christian, as 

they have already taken Malaga, and purified it by blood and fire from 

the accursed stain of infidelity." 

 

"Yes," said Castell, "we heard that in England, for I am a merchant who 

have dealings with Granada, whither I am going on my affairs." 

 

"On what affairs then goes the senora, who you say is your daughter, and 

what is that story that the sailors told of, about a fight between the 

_San Antonio_ and an English ship, which indeed we saw in the offing 

yesterday? And why did the wind blow an arrow through your arm, friend 

Merchant? And how came it that you two were left aboard the caravel when 

the marquis and his people escaped?" 

 

"You ask many questions, holy Father. Peter, fill the glass of his 

reverence; he drinks nothing who thinks that it is always Lent. Your 

health, Father. Ah! well emptied. Fill it again, Peter, and pass me the 

flask. Now I will begin to answer you with the story of the shipwreck." 

And he commenced an endless tale of the winds and sails and rocks and 

masts carried away, and of the English ship that tried to help the 

Spanish ship, and so forth, till at length the priest, whose glass Peter 

filled whenever his head was turned, fell back in his chair asleep. 

 

"Now," whispered Peter in English across the table to Castell--"now I 

think that we had best go to bed, for we have learned much from this 

holy spy--as I take him to be--and told little." 

 

So they crept away quietly to their chamber, and, having swallowed the 

draught that the doctor had given them, said their prayers each in his 

own fashion, locked the door, and lay down to rest as well as their 

wounds and sore anxieties would allow them. 


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