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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

"Do you live, John Castell?" said that hollow voice, "or are we both 

dead and in hell?" 

 

"Nay," he answered, "I live yet; we are still this side of doom." 

 

"What has chanced?" asked Peter. "I have been lost in a great 

blackness." 

 

Castell told him briefly. 

 

Peter listened till he had done, then staggered to the bulwark rail and 

looked about him, making no comment. 

 

"I can see nothing," he said presently--"the mist is too deep; but I 

think we must lie near the shore. Come, help me. Let us try to find 

victuals; I am faint." 

 

Castell rose, stretched his cramped limbs, and going to him, placed his 

uninjured arm round Peter's middle, and thus supported him towards the 

stern of the ship, where he guessed that the main cabin would be. They 

found and entered it, a small place, but richly furnished, with a carved 

crucifix screwed to its sternmost wall. A piece of pickled meat and some 

of the hard wheaten cakes such as sailors use, lay upon the floor where 

they had been cast from the table, while in a swinging rack above stood 

flagons of wine and of water. Castell found a horn mug, and filling it 

with wine gave it to Peter, who drank greedily, then handed it back to 

him, who also drank. Afterwards they cut off portions of the meat with 

their knives, and swallowed them, though Peter did this with great 

difficulty because of the hurt to his head and neck. Then they drank 

more wine, and, somewhat refreshed, left the place. 

 

The mist was still so thick that they could see nothing, and therefore 

they went into the wreck of that cabin which had been occupied by 

Margaret and Betty, sat themselves down upon the bed wherein they had 

slept, and waited. Resting thus, Peter noted that this cabin had been 

fitted sumptuously as though for the occupation of a great lady, for 

even the vessels were of silver, and in a wardrobe, whereof the doors 

were open, hung beautiful gowns. Also, there were a few written books, 

on the outer leaves of one of which Margaret had set down some notes and 

a prayer of her own making, petitioning that Heaven would protect her; 

that Peter and her father might be living and learn the truth of what 

had befallen, and that it would please the saints to deliver her, and to 

bring them together again. This book Peter thrust away within his jerkin 

to study at his leisure. 

 

Now the sun rose suddenly above the eastern range of the mountains 

wherewith they were surrounded. Leaving the cabin, they climbed to the 


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