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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

down to rest. 

 

A woman having brought hot water and some loose garments in which to 

wrap themselves while their own were drying, they undressed and washed 

and afterwards, utterly worn out, threw themselves down and fell asleep 

upon the beds, having first hidden away their gold in the food bag, 

which Peter placed beneath his pillow. Two hours later or more they were 

awakened by the arrival of Father Henriques and the barber-surgeon, 

accompanied by the woman-servant, and who brought them back their 

clothes cleaned and dried. 

 

When the surgeon saw Peter's hurt to the left side of his neck and 

shoulder, which now were black, swollen, and very stiff, he shook his 

head, and said that time and rest alone could cure it, and that he must 

have been born under a fortunate star to have escaped with his life, 

which, save for his steel cap and leather jerkin, he would never have 

done. As no bones were broken, however, all that he could do was to 

dress the parts with some soothing ointment and cover them with clean 

cloths. This finished, he turned to Castell's wound, that was through 

the fleshy part of the right forearm, and, having syringed it out with 

warm water and oil, bound it up, saying that he would be well in a week. 

He added drily that the gale must have been fiercer even than he 

thought, since it could blow an arrow through a man's arm--a saying at 

which the priest pricked up his ears. 

 

To this Castell made no answer, but producing a piece of Morella's gold, 

offered it to him for his services, asking him at the same time to 

procure them mules or horses, if he could. The barber promised to try to 

do so, and being well pleased with his fee, which was a great one for 

Motril, said that he would see them again in the evening, and if he 

could hear of any beasts would tell them of it then. Also he promised to 

bring them some clothes and cloaks of Spanish make, since those they had 

were not fit to travel in through that country, being soiled and 

blood-stained. 

 

After he had gone, and the priest with him, who was busy seeing to the 

division of the spoils from the ship and making sure of his own share, 

the servant, a good soul, brought them soup, which they drank. Then they 

lay down again upon the beds and talked together as to what they 

should do. 

 

Castell was downhearted, pointing out that they were still as far from 

Margaret as ever, who was now once more lost to them, and in the hand of 


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