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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

CHAPTER XIII 

 

THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN

 

 

Peter did not sleep well, for, notwithstanding all the barber's 

dressing, his hurt pained him much. Moreover, he was troubled by the 

thought that Margaret must be sure that both he and her father were 

dead, and of the sufferings of her sore heart. Whenever he dozed off he 

seemed to see her awake and weeping, yes, and to hear her sobs and 

murmurings of his name. When the first light of dawn crept through the 

high-barred windows, he arose and called Castell, for they could not 

dress without each other's help. Then they waited until they heard the 

sound of men talking and of beasts stamping in the courtyard without. 

Guessing that this was the barber with the mules, they unlocked their 

door and, finding the servant yawning in the passage, persuaded her to 

let them out of the house. 

 

The barber it was, sure enough, and with him a one-eyed youth mounted on 

a pony, who, he said, would guide them to Granada. So they returned with 

him into the house, where he looked at their wounds, shaking his head 

over that of Peter, who, he said, ought not to travel so soon. After 

this came more haggling as to the price of the mules, saddlery, 

saddle-bags in which they packed their few spare clothes, hire of the 

guide and his horse, and so forth, since, anxious as they were to get 

away, they did not dare to seem to have money to spare. 

 

At length everything was settled, and as their host, Father Henriques, 

had not yet appeared, they determined to depart without bidding him 

farewell, leaving some money in acknowledgment of his hospitality and as 

a gift to his church. Whilst they were handing it over to the servant, 

however, together with a fee for herself, the priest joined them, 

unshaven, and holding his hand to his tonsured head whilst he explained, 

what was not true, that he had been celebrating some early Mass in the 

church; then asked whither they were going. 

 

They told him, and pressed their gift upon him, which he accepted, 

nothing loth, though its liberality seemed to make him more urgent to 

delay their departure. They were not fit to travel; the roads were most 

unsafe; they would be taken captive by the Moors, and thrown into a 

dungeon with the Christian prisoners; no one could enter Granada without 

a passport, he declared, and so forth, to all of which they answered 

that they must go. 

 

Now he appeared to be much disturbed, and said finally that they would 

bring him into trouble with the Marquis of Morella--how or why, he would 


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