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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

said the landlord as they glanced round this comfortless garret, "but 

many great people have slept well here, as doubtless you will also," and 

he turned to descend the ladder. 

 

"It will serve," answered Castell; "but, friend, tell your men to leave 

the stable open, as we start at dawn, and be so good as to give me 

that lamp." 

 

"I cannot spare the lamp," he grunted sulkily, with his foot already on 

the first step. 

 

Peter strode to him and grasped his arm with one hand, while with the 

other he seized the lamp. The man cursed, and began to fumble at his 

belt, as though for a knife, whereon Peter, putting out his strength, 

twisted his arm so fiercely that in his pain he loosed the lamp, which 

remained in Peter's hand. The inn-keeper made a grab at it, missed his 

footing and rolled down the ladder, falling heavily on the floor below. 

 

Watching from above, to their relief they saw him pick himself up, and 

heard him begin to revile them, shaking his fist and vowing vengeance. 

Then Peter shut down the trap-door. It was ill fitted, so that the edge 

of it stood up above the flooring, also the bolt that fastened it had 

been removed, although the staples in which it used to work remained. 

Peter looked round for some stick or piece of wood to pass through these 

staples, but could find nothing. Then he bethought him of a short length 

of cord that he had in his pocket, which served to tie one of the 

saddle-bags in its place on his mule. This he fastened from one staple 

to the other, so that the trap-door could not be lifted more than an 

inch or two. 

 

Reflecting that this might be done, and the cord cut with a knife 

passed through the opening, he took one of the chairs and stood it so 

that two of its legs rested on the edge of the trap-door and the other 

two upon the boarding of the floor. Then he said to Castell: 

 

"We are snared birds; but they must get into the cage before they wring 

our necks. That wine was poisoned, and, if they can, they will murder us 

for our money--or because they have been told to do so by the guide. We 

had best keep awake to-night." 

 

"I think so," answered Castell anxiously. "Listen, they are talking down 

below." 

 

Talking they were, as though they debated something, but after a while 

the sound of voices died away. When all was silent they hunted round the 

attic, but could find nothing that was unusual to such places. Peter 

looked at the window-hole, and, as it was large enough for a man to pass 


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