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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

through, tried to drag one of the beds beneath it, thinking that if any 

such attempt were made, he who lay thereon would have the thief at his 

mercy, only to find, however, that these were screwed to the floor and 

immovable. As there was nothing more that they could do, they went and 

sat upon these beds, their bare swords in their hands, and waited a long 

while, but nothing happened. 

 

At length the lamp, which had been flickering feebly for some time, went 

out, lacking oil, and except for the light which crept through the 

window-place, for now they had torn away the sacking that hung over it, 

they were in darkness. 

 

A little while later they heard the sound of a horse's hoofs, and the 

door of the house open and shut, after which there was more talking 

below, and mingling with it a new voice which Peter seemed to remember. 

 

"I have it," he whispered to Castell. "Here is our late host, Father 

Henriques, come to see how his guests are faring." 

 

Another half-hour and the waning moon rose, throwing a beam of light 

into their chamber; also they heard horse's hoofs again. Going to the 

window, Peter looked out of it and saw the horse, a fine beast, being 

held by the landlord, then a man came and mounted it and, at some remark 

of his, turned his face upwards towards their window. It was that of 

Father Henriques. 

 

The two whispered together for a while till the priest blessed the 

landlord in Latin words and rode away, and again they heard the door of 

the house close. 

 

"He is off to Granada, to warn Morella his master of our coming," said 

Castell, as they reseated themselves upon the beds. 

 

"To warn Morella that we shall never come, perhaps; but we will beat him 

yet," replied Peter. 

 

The night wore on, and Castell, who was very weary, sank back upon the 

bolster and began to doze, when suddenly the chair that was set upon the 

trap-door fell over with a great clatter, and he sprang up, asking what 

that noise might be. 

 

"Only a rat," answered Peter, who saw no good in telling him the 

truth--namely, that thieves or murderers had tried to open the 

trap-door. 

 

Then he crept down the room, felt the cord, to find that it was still 

uncut, and replaced the chair where it had been. This done, Peter came 

back to the bed and threw himself down upon it as though he would 

slumber, though never was he more wide awake. The weariness of Castell 

had overcome him again, however, for he snored at his side. 


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