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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

"you are those men of England who boarded the _San Antonio_ and escaped 

when she was sinking, are you not?" 

 

Castell nodded, then answered: 

 

"We boarded her to seek----" 

 

"Never mind what you sought," the captain answered; "the names of 

exalted ladies should not be mentioned before strange men. But you have 

been in trouble again since then, at the inn yonder, where this tall 

senor bore himself very bravely. Oh! we have heard all the story, and 

give him honour who can wield a sword so well in the dark." 

 

"We thank you," said Castell, "but what is your business with us?" 

 

"Senor, we are sent by our master, his Excellency, the high Lord and 

Marquis of Morella, to find you and bring you to be his guests 

at Granada." 

 

"So the priest has told. I thought as much," muttered Peter. 

 

"We pray you to come without trouble, as we do not wish to do any 

violence to such gallant men," went on the captain. "Be pleased to mount 

two of these horses, and ride with us." 

 

"I am a merchant, with friends of my own at Granada," answered Castell. 

"Cannot we go to them, who do not seek the hospitality of the marquis?" 

 

"Senor, our orders are otherwise, and here the word of our master, the 

marquis, is a law that may not be broken." 

 

"I thought that Boabdil was king of Granada," said Castell. 

 

"Without doubt he is king, Senor, and by the grace of Allah will remain 

so, but the marquis is allied to him in blood; also, while the truce 

lasts, he is a representative of their Majesties of Spain in our city," 

and, at a sign, two of the Moors dismounted and led forward their 

horses, holding the stirrups, and offering to help them to the saddle. 

 

"There is nothing for it," said Peter; "we must go." So, awkwardly 

enough, for they were very stiff, they climbed on to the beasts and rode 

away with their captors. 

 

The sun was sinking now, for they had slept long, and by the time they 

reached the gates of Granada the muezzins were calling to the sunset 

prayer from the minarets of the mosques. 

 

It was but a very dim and confused idea that Peter gathered of the great 

city of the Moors, as, surrounded by their white-robed escort, he rode 

he knew not whither. Narrow winding streets, white houses, shuttered 

windows, crowds of courteous, somewhat silent people, all men, and all 

clad in those same strange, flowing dresses, who looked at them 

curiously, and murmured words which afterwards he came to learn meant 

"Christian prisoners," or sometimes "Christian dogs"; fretted and 


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