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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

him with a pretty, puzzled look. She made a sweet picture thus, he 

thought. Then he spoke to her in his slow Spanish, for somehow he knew 

that she would not understand his own tongue. 

 

"You are not Margaret," he said. 

 

At once the dream went out of the woman's soft eyes; she became 

intensely interested, and, rising, advanced towards him, a very gracious 

figure, who seemed to sway as she walked. 

 

"No, no," she said, bending over him and touching his forehead with her 

taper fingers; "my name is Inez. You wander still, Senor." 

 

"Inez what?" he asked. 

 

"Inez only," she answered, "Inez, a woman of Granada, the rest is lost. 

Inez, the nurse of sick men, Senor." 

 

"Where then is Margaret--the English Margaret?" 

 

A veil of secrecy seemed to fall over the woman's face, and her voice 

changed as she answered, no longer ringing true, or so it struck his 

senses made quick and subtle by the fires of fever: 

 

"I know no English Margaret. Do you then love her--this English 

Margaret?" 

 

"Aye," he answered, "she was stolen from me; I have followed her from 

far, and suffered much. Is she dead or living?" 

 

"I have told you, Senor, I know nothing, although"--and again the voice 

became natural--"it is true that I thought you loved somebody from your 

talk in your illness." 

 

Peter pondered a while, then he began to remember, and asked again: 

 

"Where is Castell?" 

 

"Castell? Was he your companion, the man with a hurt arm who looked like 

a Jew? I do not know where he is. In another part of the city, perhaps. 

I think that he was sent to his friends. Question me not of such 

matters, who am but your sick-nurse. You have been very ill, Senor. 

Look!" And she handed him a little mirror made of polished silver, then, 

seeing that he was too weak to take it, held it before him. 

 

Peter saw his face, and groaned, for, except the red scar upon his 

cheek, it was ivory white and wasted to nothing. 

 

"I am glad Margaret did not see me like this," he said, with an attempt 

at a smile, "bearded too, and what a beard! Lady, how could you have 

nursed one so hideous?" 

 

"I have not found you hideous," she answered softly; "besides, that is 

my trade. But you must not talk, you must rest. Drink this, and rest," 

and she gave him soup in a silver bowl, which he swallowed readily 

enough, and went to sleep again. 

 

Some days afterwards, when Peter was well on the road to convalescence, 

his beautiful nurse came and sat by him, a look of pity in her tender, 


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