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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

Eastern eyes. 

 

"What is it now, Inez?" he asked, noting her changed face. 

 

"Senor Pedro, you spoke to me a while ago, when you woke up from your 

long sleep, of a certain Margaret, did you not? Well, I have been 

inquiring of this Dona Margaret, and have no good news to tell of her." 

 

Peter set his teeth, and said: 

 

"Go on, tell me the worst." 

 

"This Margaret was travelling with the Marquis of Morella, was she 

not?" 

 

"She had been stolen by him," answered Peter. 

 

"Alas! it may be so; but here in Spain, and especially here in Granada, 

that will scarcely screen the name of one who has been known to travel 

with the Marquis of Morella." 

 

"So much the worse for the Marquis of Morella when I meet him again," 

answered Peter sternly. "What is your story, Nurse Inez?" 

 

She looked with interest at his grim, thin face, but, as it seemed to 

him, with no displeasure. 

 

"A sad one. As I have told you, a sad one. It seems that the other day 

this senora was found dead at the foot of the tallest tower of the 

marquis's palace, though whether she fell from it, or was thrown from 

it, none know." 

 

Peter gasped, and was silent for a while; then asked: 

 

"Did you see her dead?" 

 

"No, Senor; others saw her." 

 

"And told you to tell me? Nurse Inez, I do not believe your tale. If the 

Dona Margaret, my betrothed, were dead I should know it; but my heart 

tells me that she is alive." 

 

"You have great faith, Senor," said the woman, with a note of admiration 

in her voice which she could not suppress, but, as he observed, without 

contradicting him. 

 

"I have faith," he answered. "Nothing else is left; but so far it has 

been a good crutch." 

 

Peter made no further allusion to the subject, only presently he asked: 

 

"Tell me, where am I?" 

 

"In a prison, Senor." 

 

"Oh! a prison, with a beautiful woman for jailer, and other beautiful 

women"--and he pointed to a fair creature who had brought something into 

the room--"as servants. A very fine prison also," and he looked about 

him at the marbles and arches and lovely carving. 

 

"There are men without the gate, not women," she replied, smiling. 

 

"I daresay; captives can be tied with ropes of silk, can they not? Well, 

whose is this prison?" 

 

She shook her head. 

 

"I do not know, Senor. The Moorish king's perhaps--you yourself have 

said that I am only the jailer." 

 

"Then who pays you?" 

 

"Perhaps I am not paid, Senor; perhaps I work for love," and she glanced 


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