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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

at him swiftly, "or hate," and her face changed. 

 

"Not hate of me, I think," said Peter. 

 

"No, Senor, not hate of you. Why should I hate you who have been so 

helpless and so courteous to me?" and she bent the knee to him a little. 

 

"Why indeed? especially as I am also grateful to you who have nursed me 

back to life. But then, why hide the truth from a helpless man?" 

 

Inez glanced about her; the room was empty now. She bent over him and 

whispered: 

 

"Have you never been forced to hide the truth? No, I read it in your 

face, and you are not a woman--an erring woman." 

 

They looked into each other's eyes a while, then Peter asked: "Is the 

Dona Margaret really dead?" 

 

"I do not know," she answered; "I was told so." And as though she feared 

lest she should betray herself, Inez turned and left him quickly. 

 

The days went by, and through the slow degrees of convalescence Peter 

grew strong again. But they brought him no added knowledge. He did not 

know where he dwelt or why he was there. All he knew was that he lived a 

prisoner in a sumptuous palace, or as he suspected, for of this he could 

not be sure, since the arched windows of one side of the building were 

walled up, in the wing of a palace. Nobody came near to him except the 

fair Inez, and a Moor who either was deaf or could understand nothing 

that he said to him in Spanish. There were other women about, it is 

true, very pretty women all of them, who acted as servants, but none of 

these were allowed to approach him; he only saw them at a distance. 

 

Therefore Inez was his sole companion, and with her he grew very 

intimate, to a certain extent, but no further. On the occasion that has 

been described she had lifted a corner of her veil which hid her true 

self, but a long while passed before she enlarged her confidence. The 

veil was kept down very close indeed. Day by day he questioned her, and 

day by day, without the slightest show of irritation, or even annoyance, 

she parried his questions. They knew perfectly well that they were 

matching their wits against each other; but as yet Inez had the best of 

the game, which, indeed, she seemed to enjoy. He would talk to her also 

of all sorts of things--the state of Spain, the Moorish court, the 

danger that threatened Granada, whereof the great siege now drew near, 

and so forth--and of these matters she would discourse most 

intelligently, with the result that he learned much of the state of 

politics in Castile and Granada, and greatly improved his knowledge of 


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