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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

him, "that such practice is somewhat dangerous for me. It might annoy 

you before I had done. I will postpone my happiness until we are in 

the garden." 

 

"I thought so," she answered; "but look now, you must play the part, or 

I shall suffer, who am bearing much for you." 

 

"I think that I may suffer also," he murmured, but not so low that she 

did not catch his words. 

 

"No, friend Pedro," she said, turning on him, "it is the woman who 

suffers in this kind of farce. She pays; the man rides away to play 

another," and without more ado she opened the door, which proved to be 

unlocked and unguarded. 

 

Beyond the foot of some steps lay a most lovely garden. Great, tapering 

cypresses grew about it, with many orange-trees and flowering shrubs 

that filled the soft, southern air with odours. Also there were marble 

fountains into which water splashed from the mouths of carven lions, and 

here and there arbours with stone seats, whereon were laid soft cushions 

of many colours. It was a veritable place of Eastern delight and 

dreams, such as Peter had never known before he looked upon it on that 

languorous eve--he who had not seen the sky or flowers for so many weary 

weeks of sickness. It was secluded also, being surrounded by a high 

wall, but at one place the tall, windowless tower of some other building 

of red stone soared up between and beyond two lofty cypress-trees. 

 

"This is the harem garden," Inez whispered, "where many a painted 

favourite has flitted for a few happy, summer hours, till winter came 

and the butterfly was broken," and, as she spoke, she dropped her veil 

over her face and began to descend the stairs. 


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