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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

Again Peter obeyed, and with a better grace than might have been 

expected. 

 

"She is a prisoner in this same palace," she went on, "and the marquis, 

who is mad for love of her, seeks by all means, fair or foul, to make 

her his wife!" 

 

"Curse him!" exclaimed Peter with another embrace. 

 

"Till a few days ago she thought you dead; but now she knows that you 

are alive and recovering. Her father, Castell, escaped from the place 

where he was put, and is in hiding among his friends, the Jews, where 

even Morella cannot find him; indeed, he believes him fled from the 

city. But he is not fled, and, having much gold, has opened a door 

between himself and his daughter." 

 

Here she stopped to return the embrace with much warmth. Then they 

passed under some trees, and came to the marble baths where the sultanas 

were supposed to have bathed in summer, for this place had been one of 

the palaces of the Kings of Granada before they lived in the Alhambra. 

Here Inez sat down upon a seat and loosened some garment about her 

throat, for the evening was very hot. 

 

"What are you doing?" Peter asked doubtfully, for he was filled with 

many fears. 

 

"Cooling myself," she answered; "your arm was warm, and we may sit here 

for a few minutes." 

 

"Well, go on with your tale," he said. 

 

"I have little more to say, friend, except that if you wish to send any 

message, I might perhaps be able to take it." 

 

"You are an angel," he exclaimed. 

 

"That is another word for messenger, is it not? Continue." 

 

"Tell her--that if she hears anything of all this business, it isn't 

true." 

 

"On that point she may form her own opinion," replied Inez demurely. "If 

I were in her place I know what mine would be. Don't waste time; we 

must soon begin to walk again." 

 

Peter stared at her, for he could understand nothing of all this play. 

Apparently she read his look, for she answered it in a quiet, 

serious voice: 

 

"You are wondering what everything means, and why I am doing what I do. 

I will tell you, Senor, and you can believe me or not as you like. 

Perhaps you think that I am in love with you. It would not be wonderful, 

would it? Besides, in the old tales, that always happens--the lady who 

nurses the Christian knight and worships him and so forth." 

 

"I don't think anything of the sort; I am not so vain." 

 

"I know it, Senor, you are too good a man to be vain. Well, I do all 

these things, not for love of you, or any one, but for hate--for hate. 


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