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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

"I pray you, do," said Peter earnestly--"explain it fully." 

 

"I will--I will. I will work for you and her and her father, and if I 

cease to work, know that I am dead or in a dungeon, and fend for 

yourselves as best you may. One thing I can tell you for your 

comfort--no harm has been done to this lady of yours. Morella loves her 

too well for that. He wishes to make her his wife. Or perhaps he has 

sworn some oath, as I know that he has sworn that he will not murder 

you--which he might have done a score of times while you have lain a 

prisoner in his power. Why, once when you were senseless he came and 

stood over you, a dagger in his hand, and reasoned out the case with me. 

I said, 'Why do you not kill him?' knowing that thus I could best help 

to save your life. He answered, 'Because I will not take my wife with 

her lover's blood upon my hands, unless I slay him in fair fight. I 

swore it yonder in London. It was the offering which I made to God and 

to my patron saint that so I might win her fairly, and if I break that 

oath, God will be avenged upon me here and hereafter. Do my bidding, 

Inez. Nurse him well, so that if he dies, he dies without sin of mine,' 

No, he will not murder you or harm her. Friend Pedro, he dare not." 

 

"Can you think of nothing?" asked Peter. 

 

"Nothing--as yet nothing. These walls are high, guards watch them day 

and night, and outside is the great city of Granada where Morella has 

much power, and whence no Christian may escape. But he would marry her. 

And there is that handsome fool-woman, her servant, who is in love with 

him--oh! she told me all about it in the worst Spanish I ever heard, but 

the story is too long to repeat; and the priest, Father Henriques--he 

who wished that you might be killed at the inn, and who loves money so 

much. Ah! now I think I see some light. But we have no more time to 

talk, and I must have time to think. Friend Pedro, make ready your 

kisses, we must go on with our game, and, in truth, you play but badly. 

Come now, your arm. There is a seat prepared for us yonder. Smile and 

look loving. I have not art enough for both. Come!--come!" And together 

they walked out of the dense shadow of the trees and past the marble 

bath of the sultanas to a certain seat beneath a bower on which were 

cushions, and lying among them a lute. 

 

"Seat yourself at my feet," she said, as she sank on to the bench. "Can 

you sing?" 

 

"No more than a crow," he answered. 

 

"Then I must sing to you. Well, it will be better than the love-making." 


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