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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

Then in a very sweet voice she began to warble amorous Moorish ditties 

that she accompanied upon the lute, whilst Peter, who was weary in body 

and disturbed in mind, played a lover's part to the best of his ability, 

and by degrees the darkness gathered. 

 

At length, when they could no longer see across the garden, Inez ceased 

singing and rose with a sigh. 

 

"The play is finished and the curtain down," she said; "also it is time 

that you went in out of this damp. Senor Pedro, you are a very bad 

actor; but let us pray that the audience was compassionate, and took the 

will for the deed." 

 

"I did not see any audience," answered Peter. 

 

"But it saw you, as I dare say you will find out by-and-by. Follow me 

now back to your room, for I must be going about your business--and my 

own. Have you any message for the Senor Castell?" 

 

"None, save my love and duty. Tell him that, thanks to you, although 

still somewhat feeble, I am recovered of my hurt upon the ship and the 

fever which I took from the sun, and that if he can make any plan to get 

us all out of this accursed city and the grip of Morella I will bless 

his name and yours." 

 

"Good, I will not forget. Now be silent. Tomorrow we will walk here 

again; but be not afraid, then there will be no more need for 

love-making." 

 

Margaret sat by the open window-place of her beautiful chamber in 

Morella's palace. She was splendidly arrayed in a rich, Spanish dress, 

whereof the collar was stiff with pearls, she who must wear what it 

pleased her captor to give her. Her long tresses, fastened with a 

jewelled band, flowed down about her shoulders, and, her hand resting on 

her knee, from her high tower prison she gazed out across the valley at 

the dim and mighty mass of the Alhambra and the ten thousand lights of 

Granada which sparkled far below. Near to her, seated beneath a silver 

hanging-lamp, and also clad in rich array, was Betty. 

 

"What is it, Cousin?" asked the girl, looking at her anxiously. "At 

least you should be happier than you were, for now you know that Peter 

is not dead, but almost recovered from his sickness and in this very 

palace; also, that your father is well and hidden away, plotting for our 

escape. Why, then, are you so sad, who should be more joyful than 

you were?" 

 

"Would you learn, Betty? Then I will tell you. I am betrayed. Peter 

Brome, the man whom I looked upon almost as my husband, is false 

to me." 

 

"Master Peter false!" exclaimed Betty, staring at her open-mouthed. "No, 


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