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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

it is not possible. I know him; he could not be, who will not even look 

at another woman, if that is what you mean." 

 

"You say so. Then, Betty, listen and judge. You remember this afternoon, 

when the marquis took us to see the wonders of this palace, and I went 

thinking that perhaps I might find some path by which afterwards we 

could escape?" 

 

"Of course I remember, Margaret. We do not leave this cage so often that 

I am likely to forget." 

 

"Then you will remember also that high-walled garden in which we walked, 

where the great tower is, and how the marquis and that hateful priest 

Father Henriques and I went up the tower to study the prospect from its 

roof, I thinking that you were following me." 

 

"The waiting-women would not let me," said Betty. "So soon as you had 

passed in they shut the door and told me to bide where I was till you 

returned. I went near to pulling the hair out of the head of one of them 

over it, since I was afraid for you alone with those two men. But she 

drew her knife, the cat, and I had none." 

 

"You must be careful, Betty," said Margaret, "lest some of these heathen 

folk should do you a mischief." 

 

"Not they," she answered; "they are afraid of me. Why, the other day I 

bundled one of them, whom I found listening at the door, head first down 

the stairs. She complained to the marquis, but he only laughed at her, 

and now she lies abed with a plaster on her nose. But tell me 

your tale." 

 

"We climbed the tower," said Margaret, "and from its topmost room looked 

out through the windows that face south at all the mountains and the 

plain over which they dragged us from Motril. Presently the priest, who 

had gone to the north wall, in which there are no windows, and entered 

some recess there, came out with an evil smile upon his face, and 

whispered something to the marquis, who turned to me and said: 

 

"'The father tells me of an even prettier scene which we can view 

yonder. Come, Senora, and look.' 

 

"So I went, who wished to learn all that I could of the building. They 

led me into a little chamber cut in the thickness of the stone-work, in 

the wall of which are slits like loop-holes for the shooting of arrows, 

wide within, but very narrow without, so that I think they cannot be 

seen from below, hidden as they are between the rough stones of 

the tower. 

 

"'This is the place,' said the marquis, 'where in the old days the kings 

of Granada, who were always jealous, used to sit to watch their women in 


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