Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

the secret garden. It is told that thus one of them discovered his 

sultana making love to an astrologer, and drowned them both in the 

marble bath at the end of the garden. Look now, beneath us walk a couple 

who do not guess that we are the witnesses of their vows.' 

 

"So I looked idly enough to pass the time, and there I saw a tall man in 

a Moorish dress, and with him, for their arms were about each other, a 

woman. As I was turning my head away who did not wish to spy upon them 

thus, the woman lifted her face to kiss the man, and I knew her for that 

beautiful Inez who has visited us here at times, as a spy I think. 

Presently, too, the man, after paying her back her embrace, glanced 

about him guiltily, and I saw his face also, and knew it." 

 

"Who was it?" asked Betty, for this gossip of lovers interested her. 

 

"Peter Brome, no other," Margaret answered calmly, but with a note of 

despair in her voice. "Peter Brome, pale with recent sickness, but no 

other man." 

 

"The saints save us! I did not think he had it in him!" gasped Betty 

with astonishment. 

 

"They would not let me go," went on Margaret; "they forced me to see it 

all. The pair tarried for a while beneath some trees by the bath and 

were hidden there. Then they came out again and sat them down upon a 

marble seat, while the woman sang songs and the man leaned against her 

lovingly. So it went on until the darkness fell, and we went, leaving 

them there. Now," she added, with a little sob, "what say you?" 

 

"I say," answered Betty, "that it was not Master Peter, who has no 

liking for strange ladies and secret gardens." 

 

"It was he, and no other man, Betty." 

 

"Then, Cousin, he was drugged or drunk or bewitched, not the Peter whom 

we know." 

 

"Bewitched, perchance, by that bad woman, which is no excuse for him." 

 

Betty thought a while. She could not doubt the evidence, but from her 

face it was clear that she took no severe view of the offence. 

 

"Well, at the worst," she said, "men, as I have known them, are men. He 

has been shut up for a long while with that minx, who is very fair and 

witching, and it was scarcely right to watch him through a slit in a 

tower. If he were my lover, I should say nothing about it." 

 

"I will say nothing to him about that or any other matter," replied 

Margaret sternly. "I have done with Peter Brome." 

 

Again Betty thought, and spoke. 

 

"I seem to see a trick. Cousin Margaret, they told you he was dead, did 


Page 7 from 9:  Back   1   2   3   4   5   6  [7]  8   9   Forward