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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

CHAPTER XVI 

 

BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH

 

 

"Senora," said Inez, "you think that you have something against me." 

 

"No," answered Margaret, "you are--what you are; why should I blame 

you?" 

 

"Well, against the Senor Brome then?" 

 

"Perhaps, but that is between me and him. I will not discuss it with 

you." 

 

"Senora," went on Inez, with a slow smile, "we are both innocent of what 

you thought you saw." 

 

"Indeed; then who is guilty?" 

 

"The Marquis of Morella." 

 

Margaret made no answer, but her eyes said much. 

 

"Senora, you do not believe me, nor is it wonderful. Yet I speak the 

truth. What you saw from the tower was a play in which the Senor Brome 

took his part badly enough, as you may have noticed, because I told him 

that my life hung on it. I have nursed him through a sore sickness, 

Senora, and he is not ungrateful." 

 

"So I judged; but I do not understand you." 

 

"Senora, I am a slave in this house, a discarded slave. Perhaps you can 

guess the rest, it is a common story here. I was offered my freedom at a 

price, that I should weave myself into this man's heart, I who am held 

fair, and make him my lover. If I failed, then perhaps I should be sold 

as a slave--perhaps worse. I accepted--why should I not? It was a small 

thing to me. On the one hand, life, freedom, and wealth, an hidalgo of 

good blood and a gallant friend for a little while, and, on the other, 

the last shame or blackness which doubtless await me now--if I am found 

out. Senora, I failed, who in truth did not try hard to succeed. The man 

looked on me as his nurse, no more, and to me he was one very sick, no 

more. Also, we grew to be true friends, and in this way or in that I 

learned all his story, learned also why the trap was baited thus--that 

you might be deceived and fall into a deeper trap. Senora, I could not 

explain it all to him, indeed, in that chamber where we were spied on, I 

had but little chance. Still, it was necessary that he should seem to be 

what he is not, so I took him into the garden and, knowing well who 

watched us, made him act his part, well enough to deceive you it 

would seem." 

 

"Still I do not understand," said Margaret more softly. "You say that 

your life or welfare hung on this shameful business. Then why do you 

reveal it to me now?" 

 

"To save you from yourself, Senora, to save my friend the Senor Brome, 

and to pay back Morella in his own coin." 

 

"How will you do these things?" 

 

"The first two are done, I think, but the third is difficult. It is of 


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