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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

to advance themselves." 

 

"That is so, Inez. It was the chance of a lifetime, especially to one 

who, like myself, hates heretics. But why speak of it now when that 

cursed, dissolute marquis----" and he checked himself. 

 

Inez looked at him. 

 

"Father," she asked, "if I happen to be able to find you those hundred 

gold doubloons, would you do something for me?" 

 

The priest's foxy face lit up. 

 

"I wonder what there is that I would not do, my daughter!" 

 

"Even if it brought you into a quarrel with the marquis? 

 

"Once I was a secretary to the Inquisition of Seville, he would have 

more reason to fear me than I him. Aye, and fear me he should, who bear 

him no love," answered the priest with a snarl. 

 

"Then listen, Father. I have not made my confession yet; I have not told 

you, for instance, that I also hate this marquis, and with good 

cause--though perhaps you know that already. But remember that if you 

betray me, you will never see those hundred gold doubloons, and some 

other holy priest will be appointed secretary at Seville. Also worse 

things may happen to you." 

 

"Proceed, my daughter," he said unctuously; "are we not in the 

confessional--or near it?" 

 

So she told him all the plot, trusting to the man's avarice and other 

matters to protect her, for Inez hated Fray Henriques bitterly, and knew 

him from the crown of his shaven head to the soles of his erring feet, 

as she had good cause to do. Only she did not tell him whence the money 

was to come. 

 

"That does not seem a very difficult matter," he said, when she had 

finished. "If a man and a woman, unwed and outside the prohibited 

degrees, appear before me to be married, I marry them, and once the ring 

has passed and the office is said, married they are till death or the 

Pope part them." 

 

"And suppose that the man thinks he is marrying another woman, Father?" 

 

The priest shrugged his shoulders. 

 

"He should know whom he is marrying; that is his affair, not the 

Church's or mine. The names need not be spoken too loudly, my daughter." 

 

"But you would give me a writing of the marriage with them set out 

plain?" 

 

"Certainly. To you or to anybody else; why should I not?--that is, if I 

were sure of this wedding fee." 

 

Inez lifted her hand, and showed beneath it a little pile of ten 

doubloons. 

 

"Take them, Father," she said; "they will not be counted in the 

contract. There are others where they came from, whereof twenty will be 

paid before the marriage, and eighty when I have that writing 


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