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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

understand has no good name, and, if I refuse, you tell me that all of 

us will be cast into yonder dungeons to be sold as slaves or die 

prisoners of the Moors. My lord Marquis, fate and you leave me but 

little choice. On this day week I will marry you, but blame me not if 

you find me other than you think, as you have found my cousin whom you 

befooled. Till then, also, I pray you that you will leave me quite 

untroubled. If you have arrangements to make or commands to send, the 

woman Inez yonder will serve as messenger, for of her I know the worst." 

 

"I will obey you in all things, Dona Margaret," he answered humbly. "Do 

you desire to see your father or--" and he paused. 

 

"Neither of them," she answered. "I will write to them and send my 

letters by this Inez. Why should I see them," she added passionately, 

"who have done with the old days when I was free and happy, and am about 

to become the wife of the most noble Marquis of Morella, that honourable 

grandee of Spain, who tricked a poor girl by a false promise of 

marriage, and used her blind and loving folly to trap and steal me from 

my home? My lord, till this day week I bid you farewell," and, walking 

from the arcade to the fountain, she called aloud to Betty to accompany 

her to their rooms. 

 

The week for which Margaret had bargained had gone by. All was prepared. 

Inez had shown to Morella the letters that his bride to be wrote to her 

father and to Peter Brome; also the answers, imploring and passionate, 

to the same. But there were other letters and other answers which she 

had not shown. It was afternoon, swift horses were ready in the 

courtyard, and with them an escort, while, disguised as Moors, Castell 

and Peter waited under guard in a chamber close at hand. Betty, dressed 

in the robes of a Moorish woman, and thickly veiled, stood before 

Morella, to whom Inez had led her. 

 

"I come to tell you," she said, "that at sundown, three hours after we 

have passed beneath her window, my cousin and mistress will wait to be 

made your wife, but if you try to disturb her before then she will be no 

wife of yours, or any man's." 

 

"I obey," answered Morella; "and, Senora Betty, I pray your pardon, and 

that you will accept this gift from me in token of your forgiveness." 

And with a low bow he handed to her a beautiful necklace of pearls. 

 

"I take them," said Betty, with a bitter laugh, "as they may serve to 

buy me a passage back to England. But forgive you I do not, Marquis of 


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