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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

according to the old custom here, I hand the cups of wine to the 

bridegroom and the bride. That for the marquis will be drugged, since he 

must not see too clear to-night. Well, I might brew it stronger so that 

within half an hour he would not know whether he were married or single, 

and then, perhaps, she might escape with me and come to join you. But it 

is very risky, and, of course, if we were discovered--the stitch would 

be out of the wineskin, and the cellar floor might be stained!" 

 

Now Betty interrupted: 

 

"Keep your stitches whole, Cousin; if any skins are to be pricked it 

can't be helped, and at least you won't have to wipe up the mess. I am 

not going to run away from the man, more likely he will run away from 

me. I look well in this fine dress of yours, and I mean to wear it out. 

Now begone--begone, before some of them come to seek me. Don't you 

grieve for me; I'll lie in the bed that I have made, and if the worst 

comes to the worst, I have money in my pocket--or its worth--and we will 

meet again in England. Come, give my love and duty to Master Peter and 

your father, and if I should see them no more, bid them think kindly of 

Betty Dene, who was such a plague to them." 

 

Then, taking Margaret in her strong arms, she kissed her again and 

again, and fairly thrust her from the room. 

 

But when they were gone, poor Betty sat down and cried a little, till 

she remembered that hot tears might melt the paint upon her face, and, 

drying them, went to the window and watched. 

 

A while later, from her lofty niche, she saw six Moorish horsemen riding 

along the white road to the embattled gate. After them came two men and 

a woman, all splendidly mounted, also dressed as Moors, and then six 

other horsemen. They passed the gate which was opened for them and began 

to mount the slope beyond. At the crest of it the woman halted and, 

turning, waved a handkerchief. Betty answered the signal, and in another 

minute they had vanished, and she was alone. 

 

Never did she spend a more weary afternoon. Two hours later, still 

watching at her window, she saw the Moorish escort return, and knew that 

all was well, and that by now, Margaret, her lover, and her father were 

safely started on their journey. So she had not risked her life in vain. 


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