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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

before we reach that inn where Israel has arranged that we should sleep 

to-night. We will talk as we go." And talk they did, as well as the 

roughness of the road and the speed at which they must travel 

would allow. 

 

Riding as hard as they were able, at length they came to the _venta_, or 

rough hostelry, just as the darkness closed in. At the sight of it they 

thanked God aloud, for this place was across the Moorish border, and now 

they had little to fear from Granada. The host, a half-bred Spaniard and 

a Christian, expected them, having received a message from Israel, with 

whom he had had dealings, and gave them two rooms, rude enough, but 

sufficient, and good food and wine, also stabling and barley for their 

horses, bidding them sleep well and have no fear, as he and his people 

would watch and warn them of any danger. 

 

Yet it was late before they slept, who had so much to say to each 

other--especially Peter and Margaret--and were so happy at their escape, 

if only for a little while. Yet across their joy, like the sound of a 

funeral bell at a merry feast, came the thought of Betty and that 

fateful marriage in which ere now she must have played her part. Indeed, 

at last Margaret knelt down and offered up prayers to Heaven that the 

saints might protect her cousin in the great peril which she had 

incurred for them, nor was Peter ashamed to join her in that prayer. 

Then they embraced--especially Peter and Margaret--and laid them down, 

Castell and his daughter in one room, and Peter in the other, and slept 

as best they could. 

 

Half an hour before dawn Peter was up seeing to the horses while the 

others breakfasted and packed the food that the landlord had made ready 

for their journey. Then he also swallowed some meat and wine, and at the 

first break of day, having discharged their reckoning and taken a letter 

from their host to those of other inns upon the road, they pressed on 

towards Seville, very thankful to find that as yet there were no signs 

of their being pursued. 

 

All that day, with short pauses to rest themselves and their horses, 

they rode on without accident, for the most part over a fertile plain 

watered by several rivers which they crossed at fords or over bridges. 

As night fell they reached the old town of Oxuna, which for many hours 

they had seen set upon its hill before them, and, notwithstanding their 

Moorish dress, made their way almost unobserved in the darkness to that 


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