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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

inn to which they had been recommended. Here, although he stared at 

their garments, on finding that they had plenty of money, the landlord 

received them well enough, and again they were fortunate in securing 

rooms to themselves. It had been their purpose to buy Spanish clothes in 

this town, but, as it happened, it was a feast day, and at night every 

shop in the place was closed, so they could get none. Now, as they 

greatly desired to reach Seville by the following nightfall, hoping 

under cover of the darkness to find and come aboard of their ship, the 

_Margaret_, which they knew lay safely in the river, and had been 

advised by messenger of their intended journey, it was necessary for 

them to leave Oxuna before the dawn. So, unfortunately enough as it 

proved, it was impossible for them to put off their Moorish robes and 

clothe themselves as Christians. 

 

They had hoped, too, that here at Oxuna Inez might overtake them, as she 

had promised to do if she could, and give them tidings of what had 

happened since they left Granada. But no Inez came. So, comforting 

themselves with the thought that however hard she rode it would be 

difficult for her to reach them, who had some hours' start, they left 

Oxuna in the darkness before any one was astir. 

 

Having crossed some miles of plain, they passed up through olive groves 

into hills where cork-trees grew, and here stopped to eat and let the 

horses feed. Just as they were starting on again, Peter, looking round, 

saw mounted men--a dozen or more of them of very wild aspect--cantering 

through the trees evidently with the object of cutting them off. 

 

"Thieves!" he said shortly. "Ride for it." 

 

So they began to gallop, and their horses, although somewhat jaded, 

being very swift, passed in front of these men before they could regain 

the road. The band shouted to them to surrender, and, as they did not 

stop, loosed a few arrows and pursued them, while they galloped down the 

hillside on to a plain which separated them from more hills also clothed 

with cork-trees. This plain was about three miles wide and boggy in 

places. Still they kept well ahead of the brigands, as they took them to 

be, hoping that they would give up the pursuit or lose sight of them 

amongst the trees. As they entered these, however, to their dismay they 

saw, drawn up in front of them and right across the road, another band 

of rough-looking men, perhaps twelve in all. 

 

"Trap!" said Peter. "We must ride through them--it is our only chance," 


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