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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

CHAPTER XIX 

 

BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS

 

 

Betty Dene was not a woman afflicted with fears or apprehensions. Born 

of good parents, but in poverty, for six-and-twenty years she had fought 

her own way in a rough world and made the best of circumstances. 

Healthy, full-blooded, tough, affectionate, romantic, but honest in her 

way, she was well fitted to meet the ups and downs of life, to keep her 

head above the waters of a turbulent age, and to pay back as much as she 

received from man or woman. 

 

Yet those long hours which she passed alone in the high turret chamber, 

waiting till they summoned her to play the part of a false bride, were 

the worst that she had ever spent. She knew that her position was, in a 

sense, shameful, and like to end in tragedy, and, now that she faced it 

in cold blood, began to wonder why she had chosen so to do. She had 

fallen in love with the Spaniard almost at first sight, though it is 

true that something like this had happened to her before with other men. 

Then he had played his part with her, till, quite deceived, she gave all 

her heart to him in good earnest, believing in her infatuation that, 

notwithstanding the difference of their place and rank, he desired to 

make her his wife for her own sake. 

 

Afterwards came that bitter day of disillusion when she learned, as 

Inez had said to Castell, that she was but a stalking heifer used for 

the taking of the white swan, her cousin and mistress--that day when she 

had been beguiled by the letter which was still hid in her garments, and 

for her pains heard herself called a fool to her face. In her heart she 

had sworn to be avenged upon Morella then, and now the hour had come in 

which to fulfil her oath and play him back trick for cruel trick. 

 

Did she still love the man? She could not say. He was pleasing to her as 

he had always been, and when that is so women forgive much. This was 

certain, however--love was not her guide to-night. Was it vengeance then 

that led her on? Perhaps; at least she longed to be able to say to him, 

"See what craft lies hid even in the bosom of an outwitted fool." 

 

Yet she would not have done it for vengeance' sake alone, or rather she 

would have paid herself in some other fashion. No, her real reason was 

that she must discharge the debt due to Margaret and Peter, and to 

Castell who had sheltered her for years. She it was who had brought them 

into all this woe, and it seemed but just that she should bring them out 

again, even at the cost of her own life and womanly dignity. Or, 


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