Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

and receiving their salutations and good wishes. 

 

When all this was done, still smiling, Betty returned to the 

marriage-chamber, closing its door behind her, sat her down on a chair 

near the bed, and waited for the worst struggle of all--that struggle on 

which hung her life. See! Morella stirred. He sat up, gazing about him 

and rubbing his brow. Presently his eyes lit upon Betty, seated stern 

and upright in her high chair. She rose and, coming to him, kissed him 

and called him "Husband," and, still half-asleep, he kissed her back. 

Then she sat down again in her chair and watched his face. 

 

It changed, and changed again. Wonder, fear, amaze, bewilderment, 

flitted over it, till at last he said in English: 

 

"Betty, where is my wife?" 

 

"Here," answered Betty. 

 

He stared at her. "Nay, I mean the Dona Margaret, your cousin and my 

lady, whom I wed last night. And how come you here? I thought that you 

had left Granada." 

 

Betty looked astonished. 

 

"I do not understand you," she answered. "It was my cousin Margaret who 

left Granada. I stayed here to be married to you, as you arranged with 

me through Inez." 

 

His jaw dropped. 

 

"Arranged with you through Inez! Mother of Heaven! what do you mean?" 

 

"Mean?" she answered--"I mean what I say. Surely"--and she rose in 

indignation--"you have never dared to try to play some new trick 

upon me?" 

 

"Trick!" muttered Morella. "What says the woman? Is all this a dream, or 

am I mad?" 

 

"A dream, I think. Yes, it must be a dream, since certainly it was to no 

madman that I was wed last night. Look," and she held before him that 

writing of marriage signed by the priest, by him, and by herself, which 

stated that Carlos, Marquis of Morella, was on such a date, at Granada, 

duly married to the Senora Elizabeth Dene of London in England. 

 

He read it twice, then sank back gasping; while Betty hid away the 

parchment in her bosom. 

 

Then presently he seemed to go mad indeed. He raved, he cursed, he 

ground his teeth, he looked round for a sword to kill her or himself, 

but could find none. And all the while Betty sat still and gazed at him 

like some living fate. 

 

At length he was weary, and her turn came. 

 

"Listen," she said. "Yonder in London you promised to marry me; I have 

it hidden away, and in your own writing. By agreement I fled with you to 

Spain. By the mouth of your messenger and former love this marriage was 

arranged between us, I receiving your messages to me, and sending back 


Page 6 from 11:  Back   1   2   3   4   5  [6]  7   8   9   10   11   Forward