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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

at night, loving magnificence at heart, it was his custom thus to 

indulge in it, even when there were none to see him. From the way in 

which he stood, and the look upon his face, Peter knew at once that he 

was much disturbed. Hearing his step, Castell wheeled round and 

addressed him at once in the clear, decided voice which was his 

characteristic. 

 

"What is this I am told, Peter? A man killed by you before the palace 

gates? A broil! A public riot in which things went near to great 

bloodshed between the English, with you at the head of them, and the 

bodyguard of his Excellency, de Ayala. You arrested by the king, and 

bailed out by this senor. Is all this true?" 

 

"Quite," answered Peter calmly. 

 

"Then I am ruined; we are all ruined. Oh! it was an evil hour when I 

took one of your bloodthirsty trade into my house. What have you 

to say?" 

 

"Only that I want my supper," said Peter. "Those who began the story can 

finish it, for I think their tongues are nimbler than my own," and he 

glanced wrathfully at Margaret, who laughed outright, while even the 

solemn d'Aguilar smiled. 

 

"Father," broke in Margaret, "do not be angry with cousin Peter, whose 

only fault is that he hits too hard. It is I who am to blame, for I 

wished to stop to see the king against his will and Betty's, and 

then--then that brute," and her eyes filled with tears of shame and 

anger, "caught hold of me, and Peter threw him down, and afterwards, 

when he attacked him with a sword, Peter killed him with his staff, 

and--all the rest happened." 

 

"It was beautifully done," said d'Aguilar in his soft voice and foreign 

accent. "I saw it all, and made sure that you were dead. The parry I 

understood, but the way you got your smashing blow in before he could 

thrust again--ah! that----" 

 

"Well, well," said Castell, "let us eat first and talk afterwards. Senor 

d'Aguilar, you will honour my poor board, will you not, though it is 

hard to come from a king's feast to a merchant's fare?" 

 

"It is I who am honoured," answered d'Aguilar; "and as for the feast, 

his Grace is sparing in this Lenten season. At least, I could get little 

to eat, and, therefore, like the senor Peter, I am starved." 

 

Castell rang a silver bell which stood near by, whereon servants brought 

in the meal, which was excellent and plentiful. While they were setting 

it on the table, the merchant went to a cupboard in the wainscoting, and 

took thence two flasks, which he uncorked himself with care, saying that 


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