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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

he would give the senor some wine of his own country. This done, he said 

a Latin grace and crossed himself, an example which d'Aguilar followed, 

remarking that he was glad to find that he was in the house of a good 

Christian. 

 

"What else did you think that I should be?" asked Castell, glancing at 

him shrewdly. 

 

"I did not think at all, Senor," he answered; "but alas! every one is 

not a Christian. In Spain, for instance, we have many Moors and--Jews." 

 

"I know," said Castell, "for I trade with them both." 

 

"Then you have never visited Spain?" 

 

"No; I am an English merchant. But try that wine, Senor; it came from 

Granada, and they say that it is good." 

 

D'Aguilar tasted it, then drank off his glass. 

 

"It is good, indeed," he said; "I have not its equal in my own cellars 

there." 

 

"Do you, then, live in Granada, Senor d'Aguilar?" asked Castell. 

 

"Sometimes, when I am not travelling. I have a house there which my 

mother left me. She loved the town, and bought an old palace from the 

Moors. Would you not like to see Granada, Senora?" he asked, turning to 

Margaret as though to change the subject. "There is a wonderful building 

there called the Alhambra; it overlooks my house." 

 

"My daughter is never likely to see it," broke in Castell; "I do not 

purpose that she should visit Spain." 

 

"Ah! you do not purpose; but who knows? God and His saints alone," and 

again he crossed himself, then fell to describing the beauties 

of Granada. 

 

He was a fine and ready talker, and his voice was very pleasant, so 

Margaret listened attentively enough, watching his face, and forgetting 

to eat, while her father and Peter watched them both. At length the meal 

came to an end, and when the serving-men had cleared away the dishes, 

and they were alone, Castell said: 

 

"Now, kinsman Peter, tell me your story." 

 

So Peter told him, in few words, yet omitting nothing. 

 

"I find no blame in you," said the merchant when he had done, "nor do I 

see how you could have acted otherwise than you did. It is Margaret whom 

I blame, for I only gave her leave to walk with you and Betty by the 

river, and bade her beware of crowds." 

 

"Yes, father, the fault is mine, and for it I pray your pardon," said 

Margaret, so meekly that her father could not find the heart to scold 

her as he had meant to do. 

 

"You should ask Peter's pardon," he muttered, "seeing that he is like to 

be laid by the heels in a dungeon over this business, yes, and put upon 


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