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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

his trial for causing the man's death. Remember, he was in the service 

of de Ayala, with whom our liege wishes to stand well, and de Ayala, it 

seems, is very angry." 

 

Now Margaret grew frightened, for the thought that harm might come to 

Peter cut her heart. The colour left her cheek, and once again her eyes 

swam with tears. 

 

"Oh! say not so," she exclaimed. "Peter, will you not fly at once?" 

 

"By no means," he answered decidedly. "Did I not say it to the king, and 

is not this foreign lord bond for me?" 

 

"What can be done?" she went on; then, as a thought struck her, turned 

to d'Aguilar, and, clasping her slender hands, looked pleadingly into 

his face and asked: "Senor, you who are so powerful, and the friend of 

great people, will you not help us?" 

 

"Am I not here to do so, Senora? Although I think that a man who can 

call half London to his back, as I saw your cousin do, needs little help 

from me. But listen, my country has two ambassadors at this Court--de 

Ayala, whom he has offended, and Doctor de Puebla, the friend of the 

king; and, strangely enough, de Puebla does not love de Ayala. Yet he 

does love money, which perhaps will be forthcoming. Now, if a charge is 

to be laid over this brawl, it will probably be done, not by the 

churchman, de Ayala, but through de Puebla, who knows your laws and 

Court, and--do you understand me, Senor Castell?" 

 

"Yes," answered the merchant; "but how am I to get at de Puebla? If I 

were to offer him money, he would only ask more." 

 

"I see that you know his Excellency," remarked d'Aguilar drily. "You are 

right, no money should be offered; a present must be made after the 

pardon is delivered--not before. Oh! de Puebla knows that John Castell's 

word is as good in London as it is among the Jews and infidels of 

Granada and the merchants of Seville, at both of which places I have 

heard it spoken." 

 

At this speech Castell's eyes flickered, but he only answered: 

 

"May be; but how shall I approach him, Senor?" 

 

"If you will permit me, that is my task. Now, to what amount will you go 

to save our friend here from inconvenience? Fifty gold angels?" 

 

"It is too much," said Castell; "a knave like that is not worth ten. 

Indeed, he was the assailant, and nothing should be paid at all." 

 

"Ah! Senor, the merchant is coming out in you; also the dangerous man 

who thinks that right should rule the world, not kings--I mean might. 

The knave is worth nothing, but de Puebla's word in Henry's ear is 


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