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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

worth much." 

 

"Fifty angels be it then," said Castell, "and I thank you, Senor, for 

your good offices. Will you take the money now?" 

 

"By no means; not till I bring the debt discharged. Senor, I will come 

again and let you know how matters stand. Farewell, fair maiden; may the 

saints intercede for that dead rogue who brought me into your company, 

and that of your father and your cousin of the quick eye and the 

stalwart arm! Till we meet again," and, still murmuring compliments, he 

bowed himself out of the room in charge of a manservant. 

 

"Thomas," said Castell to this servant when he returned, "you are a 

discreet fellow; put on your cap and cloak, follow that Spaniard, see 

where he lodges, and find out all you can about him. Go now, swiftly." 

 

The man bowed and went, and presently Castell, listening, heard a side 

door shut behind him. Then he turned and said to the other two: 

 

"I do not like this business. I smell trouble in it, and I do not like 

the Spaniard either." 

 

"He seems a very gallant gentleman, and high-born," said Margaret. 

 

"Aye, very gallant--too gallant, and high-born--too high-born, unless I 

am mistaken. So gallant and so high-born----" And he checked himself, 

then added, "Daughter, in your wilfulness you have stirred a great rock. 

Go to your bed and pray God that it may not fall upon your house and 

crush it and us." 

 

So Margaret crept away frightened, a little indignant also, for after 

all, what wrong had she done? And why should her father mistrust this 

splendid-looking Spanish cavalier? 

 

When she was gone, Peter, who all this while had said little, looked up 

and asked straight out: 

 

"What are you afraid of, Sir?" 

 

"Many things, Peter. First, that use will be made of this matter to 

extort much money from me, who am known to be rich, which is a sin best 

absolved by angels. Secondly, that if I make trouble about paying, other 

questions will be set afoot." 

 

"What questions?" 

 

"Have you ever heard of the new Christians, Peter, whom the Spaniards 

call Maranos?" 

 

He nodded. 

 

"Then you know that a Marano is a converted Jew. Now, as it chances--I 

tell you who do not break secrets--my father was a Marano. His name does 

not matter--it is best forgotten; but he fled from Spain to England for 

reasons of his own, and took that of the country whence he 

came--Castile, or Castell. Also, as it is not lawful for Jews to live in 

England, he became converted to the Christian faith--seek not to know 


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