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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

Jew who posed as a Christian (at this statement there was a great 

sensation in court, and the queen's face hardened), although it is true 

that he had married a Christian lady, and that his daughter had been 

baptized and brought up as a Christian, of which faith she was a loyal 

member. Nor did she know--as he believed--that her father remained a 

Jew, since, otherwise, he would not have continued to seek her as his 

wife. Their Majesties would be aware, he went on, that, owing to reasons 

with which they were acquainted, he had means of getting at the truth of 

these matters concerning the Jews in England, as to which, indeed, he 

had already written to them, although, owing to his shipwreck and to the 

pressure of his private affairs, he had not yet made his report on his 

embassy in person. 

 

Continuing, he said that he admitted that he had made love to the 

serving-woman, Betty, in order to gain access to Margaret, whose father 

mistrusted him, knowing something of his mission. She was a person of no 

character. 

 

Here Betty rose and said in a clear voice: 

 

"I declare the Marquis of Morella to be a knave and a liar. There is 

more good character in my little finger than in his whole body, and," 

she added, "than in that of his mother before him"--an allusion at which 

the marquis flushed, while, satisfied for the present with this 

home-thrust, Betty sat down. 

 

He had proposed to Margaret, but she was not willing to marry him, as he 

found that she was affianced to a distant cousin of hers, the Senor 

Peter Brome, a swashbuckler who was in trouble for the killing of a man 

in London, as he had killed the soldier of the Holy Hermandad in Spain. 

Therefore, in his despair, being deeply enamoured of her, and knowing 

that he could offer her great place and fortune, he conceived the idea 

of carrying her off, and to do so was obliged, much against his will, to 

abduct Betty also. 

 

So after many adventures they came to Granada, where he was able to show 

the Dona Margaret that the Senor Peter Brome was employing his 

imprisonment in making love to that member of his household, Inez, who 

had been spoken of, but now could not be found. 

 

Here Peter, who could bear this no longer, also rose and called him a 

liar to his face, saying that if he had the opportunity he would prove 

it on his body, but was ordered by the king to sit down and be silent. 

 

Having been convinced of her lover's unfaithfulness, the marquis went 

on, the Dona Margaret had at length consented to become his wife on 


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