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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

condition that her father, the Senor Brome, and her servant, Betty Dene, 

were allowed to escape from Granada---- 

 

"Where," remarked the queen, "you had no right to detain them, Marquis. 

Except, perhaps, the father, John Castell," she added significantly. 

 

Where, he admitted with sorrow, he had no right to detain them. 

 

"Therefore," went on the queen acutely, "there was no legal or moral 

consideration for this alleged promise of marriage,"--a point at which 

the lawyers nodded approvingly. 

 

The marquis submitted that there was a consideration; that at any rate 

the Dona Margaret wished it. On the day arranged for the wedding the 

prisoners were let go, disguised as Moors, but he now knew that through 

the trickery of the woman Inez, whom he believed had been bribed by 

Castell and his fellow-Jews, the Dona Margaret escaped in place of her 

servant, Betty, with whom he subsequently went through the form of 

marriage, believing her to be Margaret. 

 

As regards the embrace before the ceremony, it took place in a shadowed 

room, and he thought that Betty's face and hair must have been painted 

and dyed to resemble those of Margaret. For the rest, he was certain 

that the ceremonial cup of wine that he drank before he led the woman to 

the altar was drugged, since he only remembered the marriage itself very 

dimly, and after that nothing at all until he woke upon the following 

morning with an aching brow to see Betty sitting by him. As for the 

power of administration which she produced, being perfectly mad at the 

time with rage and disappointment, and sure that if he stopped there any 

longer he should commit the crime of killing this woman who had deceived 

him so cruelly, he gave it that he might escape from her. Their 

Majesties would notice also that it was in favour of the Marchioness of 

Morella. As this marriage was null and void, there was no Marchioness of 

Morella. Therefore, the document was null and void also. That was the 

truth, and all he had to say. 


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