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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

marriage. Let not my dead hand lie heavy upon you, Margaret." 

 

"Yet," she replied in gentle indignation, "heavy must it always lie, 

since it is about my heart. Be sure of this, Peter, that if such 

dreadful ill should fall upon us, as you left me so shall you find me, 

here or hereafter." 

 

"So be it," he said with a sigh of relief, for he could not bear to 

think of Margaret as the wife of some other man, even after he was gone, 

although his honest, simple nature, and fear lest her life might be made 

empty of all joy, caused him to say what he had said. 

 

Then behind the shelter of a flowering bush they embraced each other as 

do those who know not whether they will ever kiss again, and, the hour 

of sunset having come, parted as they must. 

 

On the following morning once more Castell and Margaret were led to the 

Hall of Justice in the Alcazar; but this time Peter did not go with 

them. The great court was already full of counsellors, officers, 

gentlemen, and ladies who had come from curiosity, and other folk 

connected with or interested in the case. As yet, however, Margaret 

could not see Morella or Betty, nor had the king and queen taken their 

seats upon the throne. Peter was already there, standing before the bar 

with guards on either side of him, and greeted them with a smile and a 

nod as they were ushered to their chairs near by. Just as they reached 

them also trumpets were blown, and from the back of the hall, walking 

hand in hand, appeared their Majesties of Spain, Ferdinand and Isabella, 

whereat all the audience rose and bowed, remaining standing till they 

were seated on the thrones. 

 

The king, whom they now saw for the first time, was a thickset, active 

man with pleasant eyes, a fair skin, and a broad forehead, but, as 

Margaret thought, somewhat sly-faced--the face of a man who never forgot 

his own interests in those of another. Like the queen, he was 

magnificently attired in garments broidered with gold and the arms of 

Aragon, while in his hand he held a golden sceptre surmounted by a 

jewel, and about his waist, to show that he was a warlike king, he wore 

his long, cross-handled sword. Smilingly he acknowledged the homage of 

his subjects by lifting his hand to his cap and bowing. Then his eye 

fell upon the beautiful Margaret, and, turning, he put a question to the 

queen in a light, sharp voice, asking if that were the lady whom Morella 

had married, and, if so, why in the name of heaven he wished to be 

rid of her. 


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