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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

whisperings about her, no, nor even of Morella or of Margaret, till she 

reached the open space in front of the bar where Peter and his guards, 

gazing with all their eyes, hastened to make place for her. There she 

curtseyed thrice, twice to the queen, and once to the king, her consort; 

then, turning, bowed to the marquis, who fixed his eyes upon the ground 

and took no note, bowed to Castell and Peter, and lastly, advancing to 

Margaret, gave her her cheek to kiss. This Margaret did with becoming 

humility, whispering in her ear: 

 

"How fares your Grace?" 

 

"Better than you would in my shoes," whispered Betty back with ever so 

slight a trembling of her left eyelid; while Margaret heard the king 

mutter to the queen: 

 

"A fine peacock of a woman. Look at her figure and those big eyes. 

Morella must be hard to please." 

 

"Perhaps he prefers swans to peacocks," answered the queen in the same 

voice with a glance at Margaret, whose quieter and more refined beauty 

seemed to gain by contrast with that of her nobly built and 

dazzling-skinned cousin. Then she motioned to Betty to take the seat 

prepared for her, which she did, with her suite standing behind her and 

an interpreter at her side. 

 

"I am somewhat bewildered," said the king, glancing from Morella to 

Betty and from Margaret to Peter, for evidently the humour of the 

situation did not escape him. "What is the exact case that we have 

to try?" 

 

Then one of the legal assessors, or alcaldes, rose and said that the 

matter before their Majesties was a charge against the Englishman at the 

bar of killing a certain soldier of the Holy Hermandad, but that there 

seemed to be other matters mixed up with it. 

 

"So I gather," answered the king; "for instance, an accusation of the 

carrying off of subjects of a friendly Power out of the territory of 

that Power; a suit for nullity of a marriage, and a cross-suit for the 

declaration of the validity of the said marriage--and the holy saints 

know what besides. Well, one thing at a time. Let us try this tall 

Englishman." 

 

So the case was opened against Peter by a public prosecutor, who 

restated it as it had been laid before the queen. The Captain Arrano 

gave his evidence as to the killing of the soldier, but, in 

cross-examination by Peter's advocate, admitted, for evidently he bore 

no malice against the prisoner, that the said soldier had roughly 

handled the Dona Margaret, and that the said Peter, being a stranger to 

the country, might very well have taken them for a troop of bandits or 


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