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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

"Yes," broke in the queen, "but we have also heard what you, a grandee 

of Spain, did to this gentleman of England, and the charge you brought 

against him, which, it seems, the Dona Margaret does not believe." 

 

"In truth, no, your Majesty," said Margaret. "Let me be sworn also, and 

I can explain much of what the marquis has told to you. I never wished 

to marry him or any man, save this one," and she touched Peter on the 

arm, "and anything that he or I may have done, we did to escape the evil 

net in which we were snared." 

 

"We believe it," answered the queen with a smile, then fell to 

consulting with the king and the alcaldes. 

 

For a long time they debated in voices so low that none could hear what 

they said, looking now at one and now at another of the parties to this 

strange suit. Also, some priest was called into their council, which 

Margaret thought a bad omen. At length they made up their minds, and in 

a low, quiet voice and measured words her Majesty, as Queen of Castile, 

gave the judgment of them all. Addressing herself first to Morella, 

she said: 

 

"My lord Marquis, you have brought very grave charges against the lady 

who claims to be your wife, and the Englishman whose affianced bride you 

admit you snatched away by fraud and force. This gentleman, on his own 

behalf and on behalf of these ladies, has challenged you to a combat to 

the death in a fashion that none can mistake. Do you accept his 

challenge?" 

 

"I would accept it readily enough, your Majesty," answered Morella in 

sullen tones, "since heretofore none have doubted my courage; but I must 

remember that I am"--and he paused, then added--"what your Majesties 

know me to be, a grandee of Spain, and something more, wherefore it is 

scarcely lawful for me to cross swords with a Jew-merchant's clerk, for 

that was this man's high rank and office in England." 

 

"You could cross them with me on your ship, the _San Antonio_," 

exclaimed Peter bitterly, "why then are you ashamed to finish what you 

were not ashamed to begin? Moreover, I tell you that in love or war I 

hold myself the equal of any woman-thief and bastard in this kingdom, 

who am one of a name that has been honoured in my own." 

 

Now again the king and queen spoke together of this question of rank--no 

small one in that age and country. Then Isabella said: 

 

"It is true that a grandee of Spain cannot be asked to meet a simple 

foreign gentleman in single combat. Therefore, since he has thought fit 


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