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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

 

"There remain other matters on which we must give judgment. The senora 

here," and she pointed to Betty, "asks that her marriage should be 

declared valid, or so we understand, and the Marquis of Morella asks 

that his marriage with the said senora should be declared void, or so 

we understand. Now this is a question over which we claim no power, it 

having to do with a sacrament of the Church. Therefore we leave it to 

his Holiness the Pope in person, or by his legate, to decide according 

to his wisdom in such manner as may seem best to him, if the parties 

concerned should choose to lay their suit before him. Meanwhile, we 

declare and decree that the senora, born Elizabeth Dene, shall 

everywhere throughout our dominions, until or unless his Holiness the 

Pope shall decide to the contrary, be received and acknowledged as the 

Marchioness of Morella, and that during his lifetime her reputed husband 

shall make due provision for her maintenance, and that after his death, 

should no decision have been come to by the court of Rome upon her suit, 

she shall inherit and enjoy that proportion of his lands and property 

which belongs to a wife under the laws of this realm." 

 

Now, while Betty bowed her thanks to their Majesties till the jewels on 

her bodice rattled, and Morella scowled till his face looked as black as 

a thunder-cloud above the mountains, the audience, whispering to each 

other, once more rose to disperse. Again the queen held up her hand, for 

the judgment was not yet finished. 

 

"We have a question to ask of the gallant Sir Peter Brome and the Dona 

Margaret, his affianced. Is it still their desire to take each other in 

marriage?" 

 

Now Peter looked at Margaret, and Margaret looked at Peter, and there 

was that in their eyes which both of them understood, for he answered in 

a clear voice: 

 

"Your Majesty, that is the dearest wish of both of us." 

 

The queen smiled a little, then asked: "And do you, Senor John 

Castell, consent and allow your daughter's marriage to this knight?" 

 

"I do, indeed," he answered gravely. "Had it not been for this man 

here," and he glanced with bitter hatred at Morella, "they would have 

been united long ago, and to that end," he added with meaning, "such 

little property as I possessed has been made over to trustees in England 

for their benefit and that of their children. Therefore I am 

henceforward dependent upon their charity." 

 

"Good," said the queen. "Then one question remains to be put, and only 


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