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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

CHAPTER XXIII 

 

FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN

 

 

A week had gone by. Margaret was in the palace, where Peter had been to 

see her twice, and found her broken-hearted. Even the fact that they 

were to be wed upon the following Saturday, the day fixed also for the 

combat between Peter and Morella, brought her no joy or consolation. For 

on the next day, the Sunday, there was to be an "Act of Faith," an 

_auto-da-fe_ in Seville, when wicked heretics, such as Jews, Moors, and 

persons who had spoken blasphemy, were to suffer for their crimes--some 

by fire on the Quemadero, or place of burning, outside the city; some by 

making public confession of their grievous sin before they were carried 

off to perpetual and solitary imprisonment; some by being garotted 

before their bodies were given to the flames, and so forth. In this 

ceremony it was known that John Castell had been doomed to play a 

leading part. 

 

On her knees, with tears and beseechings, Margaret had prayed the queen 

for mercy. But in this matter those tears produced no more effect upon 

the heart of Isabella than does water dripping on a diamond. Gentle 

enough in other ways, where questions of the Faith were concerned she 

had the craft of a fox and the cruelty of a tiger. She was even 

indignant with Margaret. Had not enough been done for her? she asked. 

Had she not even passed her royal word that no steps should be taken to 

deprive the accused of such property as he might own in Spain if he were 

found guilty, and that none of those penalties which, according to law 

and custom fell upon the children of such infamous persons, should 

attach to her, Margaret? Was she not to be publicly married to her 

lover, and, should he survive the combat, allowed to depart with him in 

honour without even being asked to see her father expiate his iniquity? 

Surely, as a good Christian she should rejoice that he was given this 

opportunity of reconciling his soul with God and be made an example to 

others of his accursed faith. Was she then a heretic also? 

 

So she stormed on, till Margaret crept from her presence wondering 

whether this creed could be right that would force the child to inform 

against and bring the parent to torment. Where were such things written 

in the sayings of the Saviour and His Apostles? And if they were not 

written, who had invented them? 

 

"Save him!--save him!" Margaret had gasped to Peter in despair. "Save 

him, or I swear to you, however much I may love you, however much we may 


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