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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

fellow to see Peter that he cast his arms about him and hugged him, for 

they had not met since that desperate adventure of the boarding of the 

_San Antonio_. 

 

"Is your ship fit for sea, Captain?" asked Peter. 

 

"She will never be fitter," he answered. "When shall I get sailing 

orders?" 

 

"When the owner comes aboard," answered Peter. 

 

"Then we shall stop here until we rot; they have trapped him in their 

Inquisition. What is in your mind, Peter Brome?--what is in your mind? 

Is there a chance?" 

 

"Aye, Captain, I think so, if you have a dozen fellows of the right 

English stuff between decks." 

 

"We have got that number, and one or two more. But what's the plan?" 

 

Peter told him. 

 

"Not so bad," said Smith, slapping his heavy hand upon his knee; "but 

risky--very risky. That Inez must be a good girl. I should like to marry 

her, notwithstanding her bygones." 

 

Peter laughed, thinking what an odd couple they would make. "Hear the 

rest, then talk," he said. "See now! On Saturday next Mistress Margaret 

and I are to be married in the cathedral; then, towards sunset, the 

Marquis of Morella and I run our course in the great bull-ring yonder, 

and you and half a dozen of your men will be present. Now, I may conquer 

or I may fail----" 

 

"Never!--never!" said the captain. "I wouldn't give a pair of old boots 

for that fine Spaniard's chance when you get at him. Why, you will crimp 

him like a cod-fish!" 

 

"God knows!" answered Peter. "If I win, my wife and I make our adieux to 

their Majesties, and ride away to the quay, where the boat will be 

waiting, and you will row us on board the _Margaret_. If I fail, you 

will take up my body, and, accompanied by my widow, bring it in the same 

fashion on board the _Margaret_, for I shall give it out that in this 

case I wish to be embalmed in wine and taken back to England for burial. 

In either event, you will drop your ship a little way down the river 

round the bend, so that folk may think that you have sailed. In the 

darkness you must work her back with the tide and lay her behind those 

old hulks, and if any ask you why, say that three of your men have not 

yet come aboard, and that you have dropped back for them, and whatever 

else you like. Then, in case I should not be alive to guide you, you and 

ten or twelve of the best sailors will land at the spot that this 

gentleman will show you to-morrow, wearing Spanish cloaks so as not to 

attract attention, but being well armed underneath them, like idlers 


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