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HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

muttered the marriage service of their faith, the ring was set upon her 

hand, the troths were plighted, the benediction spoken, and they were 

man and wife till death should them part, that death which stood so near 

to them in this hour of life fulfilled. Then they two, who already that 

morning had made confession of their sins, kneeling alone before the 

altar, ate of the holy Bread, sealing a mystery with a mystery. 

 

All was done and over, and rising, they turned and stayed a moment hand 

in hand while the sweet-voiced choir sang some wondrous chant. 

Margaret's eyes wandered over the congregation till presently they 

lighted upon the dark face of Morella, who stood apart a little way, 

surrounded by his squires and gentlemen, and watched her. More, he came 

to her, and bowing low, whispered to her: 

 

"We are players in a strange game, my lady Margaret, and what will be 

its end, I wonder? Shall I be dead to-night, or you a widow? Aye, and 

where was its beginning? Not here, I think. And where, oh where shall 

this seed we sow bear fruit? Well, think as kindly of me as you can, 

since I loved you who love me not." 

 

And again bowing, first to her, then to Peter, he passed on, taking no 

note of Betty, who stood near, considering him with her large eyes, as 

though she also wondered what would be the end of all this play. 

 

Surrounded by their courtiers, the king and queen left the cathedral, 

and after them came the bridegroom and the bride. They mounted their 

horses and in the glory of the southern sunlight rode through the 

cheering crowd back to the palace and to the marriage feast, where their 

table was set but just below that of their Majesties. It was long and 

magnificent; but little could they eat, and, save to pledge each other 

in the ceremonial cup, no wine passed their lips. At length some 

trumpets blew, and their Majesties rose, the king saying in his thin, 

clear voice that he would not bid his guests farewell, since very 

shortly they would all meet again in another place, where the gallant 

bridegroom, a gentleman of England, would champion the cause of his 

relative and countrywoman against one of the first grandees of Spain 

whom she alleged had done her wrong. That fray, alas! would be no 

pleasure joust, but to the death, for the feud between these knights was 

deep and bitter, and such were the conditions of their combat. He could 

not wish success to the one or to the other; but of this he was sure, 

that in all Seville there was no heart that would not give equal honour 


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