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Table of contents
HOW PETER MET THE SPANIARD
JOHN CASTELL
PETER GATHERS VIOLETS
LOVERS DEAR
CASTELL'S SECRET
FAREWELL
NEWS FROM SPAIN
D'AGUILAR SPEAKS
THE SNARE
THE CHASE
THE MEETING ON THE SEA
FATHER HENRIQUES
THE ADVENTURE OF THE INN
INEZ AND HER GARDEN
PETER PLAYS A PART
BETTY SHOWS HER TEETH
THE PLOT
THE HOLY HERMANDAD
BETTY PAYS HER DEBTS
ISABELLA OF SPAIN
BETTY STATES HER CASE
THE DOOM OF JOHN CASTELL
FATHER HENRIQUES AND THE BAKER'S OVEN
THE FALCON STOOPS
HOW THE _MARGARET_ WON OUT TO SEA
ENVOI

to the conqueror and the conquered, sure also that both would bear 

themselves as became brave knights of Spain and England. 

 

Then the trumpets blew again, and the squires and gentlemen who were 

chosen to attend him came bowing to Peter, and saying that it was time 

for him to arm. Bride and bridegroom rose and, while all the spectators 

fell back out of hearing, but watching them with curious eyes, spoke 

some few words together. 

 

"We part," said Peter, "and I know not what to say." 

 

"Say nothing, husband," she answered him, "lest your words should weaken 

me. Go now, and bear you bravely, as you will for your own honour and 

that of England, and for mine. Dead or living you are my darling, and 

dead or living we shall meet once more and be at rest for aye. My 

prayers be with you, Sir Peter, my prayers and my eternal love, and may 

they bring strength to your arm and comfort to your heart." 

 

Then she, who would not embrace him before all those folk, curtseyed 

till her knee almost touched the ground, while low he bent before her, a 

strange and stately parting, or so thought that company; and taking the 

hand of Betty, Margaret left him. 

 

* * * * * 

 

Two hours had gone by. The Plaza de Toros, for the great square where 

tournaments were wont to be held was in the hands of those who prepared 

it for the _auto-da-fe_ of the morrow, was crowded as it had seldom been 

before. This place was a huge amphitheatre--perchance the Romans built 

it--where all sorts of games were celebrated, among them the baiting of 

bulls as it was practised in those days, and other semi-savage sports. 

Twelve thousand people could sit upon the benches that rose tier upon 

tier around the vast theatre, and scarce a seat was empty. The arena 

itself, that was long enough for horses starting at either end of it to 

come to their full speed, was strewn with white sand, as it may have 

been in the days when gladiators fought there. Over the main entrance 

and opposite to the centre of the ring were placed the king and queen 

with their lords and ladies, and between them, but a little behind, her 

face hid by her bridal veil, sat Margaret, upright and silent as a 

statue. Exactly in front of them, on the further side of the ring in a 

pavilion, and attended by her household, appeared Betty, glittering with 

gold and jewels, since she was the lady in whose cause, at least in 

name, this combat was to be fought _a l'outrance._ Quite unmoved she 


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